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Morbid

Morbid Network | Wondery

True Crime, Comedy, Society & Culture, Exhibit C

4.589.9K Ratings

Overview

It’s a lighthearted nightmare in here, weirdos! Morbid is a true crime, creepy history and all things spooky podcast hosted by an autopsy technician and a hairstylist. Join us for a heavy dose of research with a dash of comedy thrown in for flavor.


630 Episodes

Episode 564: Fred & Rose West (Part 1)

In this four part series, we dive into the horrific crimes of Fred & Rose West. We begin by exploring Fred's formative years which laid a foundation for his callousness and depraved appetites.Thank you to the wondrous Dave White of Bring Me the Axe Podcast for Research!ReferencesAmis, Martin. 2000. When darkness met light. May 11. Accessed March 21, 2024. https://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/2000/may/11/features11.g2.BBC News. 1998. Fred West 'admitted killing waitress'. March 25. Accessed March 19, 2024. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/69928.stm.—. 2001. How many more did Fred West kill? September 27. Accessed March 19, 2024. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/1567038.stm.—. 2021. The 12 victims of Fred and Rosemary West. May 27. Accessed March 18, 2024. https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-gloucestershire-57182844.Bennett, Will. 1995. Step-daughter Charmaine was first to die. November 22. Accessed March 19, 2024. https://www.independent.co.uk/news/stepdaughter-charmaine-was-first-to-die-1583071.html.Birmingham Evening Mail. 1974. "Missing girls theory." Birmingham Evening Mail, January 7: 1.Birmingham Post. 1968. "Missing waitress mystery deepens." Birmingham Post, January 23: 2.—. 1974. "Student missing for six days may return ton university-police." Birmingham Post, January 2: 2.—. 1968. "Yard detectives join search for Gloucester girl." Birmingham Post, January 9: 1.Campbell, Duncan. 1995. "How a string of girls came to die in depraved and appalling circumstances." The Guardian, October 7.Duce, Richard. 1995. "West's suicide avenged killings, QC tells jurors." The Times, November 16.Duce, Richard, and Bill Frost. 1995. "Court told of depravity at 25 Cromwell Street." The Times, October 7: 4.Evening Post. 1968. "Helicopter joins hunt for Mary." Evening Post, January 8: 1.Evening Standard. 1974. "Have you spotted this girl?" Evening Standard, July 4: 18.Frost, Bill. 1995. "Cromwell Street murders case man is dead." The Times, Janaury 2.Frost, Bill, and Richard Duce. 1995. "I'm being made a scapegoat, says West." The Times, November 2.—. 1995. "No place for sentiment, West jurors are told." The Times, October 4.—. 1995. "West: I fell under Fred's spell." The Times, October 31.Gloucester Echo. 1994. "Did builder know Mary?" Gloucester Echo, March 8: 3.—. 1994. "Graden bodies: Who were they?" Gloucester Echo, March 2: 1.Gloucestershire Echo. 1995. "From angelic child to coldest of killers." Gloucestershire Echo 5.—. 1995. "Fred West found dead." Gloucestershire Echo, January 2: 1.—. 1995. "I'll see you in court, Rose." Gloucestershire Echo, January 4: 1.Knight, Adam. 2014. Fred West's brother denies incest claims. November 7. Accessed March 17, 2024. https://www.herefordtimes.com/news/11587578.fred-wests-brother-denies-incest-claims/.Lee, Adrian, Tim Jones, and Damian Whitworth. 1996. "Fred West's brother hangs himself." The Times, November 29.Ovington, Paul. 1974. "Hunt steps up as fear grows for Lucy, 21." Western Daily Press and Times, January 4: 1.Sounes, Howard. 1995. Fred & Rose: The Full Story of Fred and Rose West and the Gloucester House of Horrors. New York, NY: Open Road Media.United Press International. 1995. "British jury convicts West of 10 murders." UPI Archive, November 22.West, Mae, and Neil McKay. 2018. Love as Always, Mum: The True and Terrible Story of Surviving a Childhood with Fred and Rose West. London, UK: Seven Dials Press.Williams, Martin. 1994. "'Our sister is still alive'." Gloucester Echo, February 26: 1.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Published: 16 May 2024

Episode 563: A Deeper Look at the Crimes of Joran van der Sloot With Christopher Cassel

We are joined by Christopher Cassel, Director of 'Pathological: The Lies of Joran Van Der Sloot', We discuss his documentary which dives deep into the crimes of the Van Der Sloot, and the countless people his actions have negatively impacted. Want to see the documentary? Stream it now on Peacock!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 13 May 2024

Episode 562: The Murder of Natalee Holloway

On the afternoon of May 30, 2005, the senior students from Mountain Brook High School gathered at the airport in Aruba to make their return flight to Alabama after their celebratory trip, when chaperones noticed that one of the students was missing. Eighteen-year-old Natalee Holloway was last seen around 1:30 am that morning, leaving a bar with a student from the local International School of Aruba, but no one had seen or heard from her since and when they checked the hotel, Natalee’s luggage and other belongings were still in her room.  It would take nearly twenty years before her killer was held responsible and the truth about her disappearance was brought to light. Thank you to the wondrous Dave White of Bring Me the Axe Podcast for Research! ReferencesABC News. 2006. Exclusive: van der Sloot talks about night out. February 22. Accessed March 26, 2024. https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/story?id=1648218.Associated Press. 2005. "Three young suspects can be held in case of missing girl, judge rules." New York Times, June 12.—. 2005. "Two suspects to be held in girl's case." New York Times, June 9.—. 2012. "Natalee Holloway declared dead by judge six years after disappearance." The Guardian, January 12.Burrough, Bryan. 2006. "Missing White Female." Vanity Fair, November 20.Chandler, Kim. 2023. "Attorney describes Joran van der Sloot's confession." Montgomery Advertiser, November 11: 1.CNN News. 2010. Interpol: Van der Sloot tried to extort Holloway's mother. June 9. Accessed March 27, 2024. http://www.cnn.com/2010/CRIME/06/08/us.van.der.sloot.alabama/.CNN Wire. 2012. Van der Sloot sentenced to 28 years for Peru murder . January 13. Accessed March 27, 2024. https://www.cnn.com/2012/01/13/world/americas/peru-van-der-sloot-sentence.Holloway, Beth. 2007. "My daughter disappeared." Good Housekeeping, November 1: 185.Holloway, Dave, R. Stephanie Good, and Larry Garrison. 2023. Aruba: The Tragic Untold Story of Natalee Holloway and Corruption in Paradise. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishing.Lybrand, Holmes, Jean Casarez, and Evan Perez. 2023. FBI details how van der Sloot’s confession in Natalee Holloway’s death came together. October 24. Accessed March 27, 2024. https://www.cnn.com/2023/10/24/us/joran-van-der-sloot-holloway-plea-deal/index.html.Lyman, Rick. 2005. "Missing woman's case spurs discussion of news coverage." New York Times, August 7.NBC News. 2005. Aruban police again search landfill for Holloway. July 28. Accessed March 26, 2024. https://www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna8745217.—. 2010. Van der Sloot admits Holloway family extortion plot: 'Why not?'. September 6. Accessed March 27, 2024. https://www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna39023617.Nelson, Andrew. 2005. "Missing teen's friends, family continue hope." Birmingham Post-Herald, June 6: 24.News, ABC. 2006. "Dutch teen tells Primetime about night with Natalee Holloway." ABC News, February 23.Norton, Michael. 2005. "FBI answers mother's plea to aid search." Montgomery Advertiser, June 4: 1.Robinson, Carol. 2023. Listen to Joran van der Sloot describe Natalee Holloway’s final moments in chilling confession. October 18. Accessed March 27, 2024. https://www.al.com/news/2023/10/listen-to-joran-van-der-sloot-describe-natalee-holloways-final-moments-in-chilling-confession.html.Robinson, Carol, and Ivana Hrynkiw. 2023. Joran van der Sloot confesses to killing Natalee Holloway: ‘You terminated her dreams,’ mother says. October 18. Accessed March 27, 2024. https://www.al.com/news/2023/10/joran-van-der-sloot-expected-to-plead-guilty-in-natalee-holloway-extortion-case-today-latest-updates.html.Robinson, Gene. 2005. "Missing white women and the media." Washington Post, June 14.The Independent. 2010. "Sex, lies and a murder suspect with a story to sell." The Independent, June 23.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 9 May 2024

Episode 561: “Jolly Jane” Toppan: Angel of Mercy (Part 2)

Considered among the first (and certainly the most prolific) American female serial killers and so-called angels of mercy, Jane Toppan’s killing spree went unnoticed for more than fifteen years, as she transitioned from one hospital to another, leaving an unprecedented trail of carnage in her wake. Jane was finally arrested in 1901, after killing the entire family of a man for whom she’d been hired to provide care. The arrest and trial were a sensation, as murder and cruelty were a direct contradiction of the norms and standards long relied upon to define American womanhood.  Thank you to the amazing Dave White of Bring me the Axe Podcast for research! ReferencesBoston Globe. 1902. "Agree that she's insane." Boston Globe, April 6: 1.—. 1901. "Alden P. Davis' death due to another cause." Boston Globe, November 21: 1.—. 1901. "Hint to watch Miss Toppan." Boston Globe, October 31: 5.—. 1901. "Inquiry is under way." Boston Globe, August 31: 1.—. 1902. "Is Miss Toppan sane." Boston Globe, March 26: 1.—. 1904. "Jane Toppan an imbecile." Boston Globe, July 10: 6.—. 1902. "Jane Toppan insane, found not guilty." Boston Globe, June 24: 1.—. 1938. "Jane Toppan, poisoner of 31, dies in hospital at age pf 81." Boston Globe, August 18: 1.—. 1901. "Marriage and money." Boston Globe, November 1: 1.—. 1901. "Murder by poison." Boston Globe, October 31: 1.—. 1901. "No cause for suspicion." Boston Globe, November 4: 2.Lowell Historical Society. 2022. Lowell’s ties to “Jolly” Jane, Massachusetts’ Female Serial Killer. October 29. Accessed March 28, 2024. https://www.lowellhistoricalsociety.org/lowells-ties-to-jolly-jane-massachusetts-female-serial-killer/.New York Times. 1904. "Jane Toppan, an extraordinary case of moral insanity." New York Times, October 23: A2.—. 1938. "Miss Jane Toppan, 84, Mass poisoner, dies." New York Times, August 18: 15.Schechter, Harold. 2012. Fatal: The Poisonous Life of a Female Serial Killer. New York, NY: Pocket Books.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 6 May 2024

Episode 560: “Jolly Jane” Toppan: Angel of Mercy (Part 1)

When Jane Toppan began training to be a nurse at Cambridge Hospital in 1885, she was bright, eager, and well-liked by her peers and seemed to form easy bonds with the oldest and most vulnerable patients. What no one knew at the time was, once Jane managed to get time alone with her patients, she began conducting medical experiments by injecting them with various drugs and even going so far as to get into bed with them to hold them close to her as they died from the overdoses she’d administered. Thank you to the amazing Dave White of Bring me the Axe Podcast for research! ReferencesBoston Globe. 1902. "Agree that she's insane." Boston Globe, April 6: 1.—. 1901. "Alden P. Davis' death due to another cause." Boston Globe, November 21: 1.—. 1901. "Hint to watch Miss Toppan." Boston Globe, October 31: 5.—. 1901. "Inquiry is under way." Boston Globe, August 31: 1.—. 1902. "Is Miss Toppan sane." Boston Globe, March 26: 1.—. 1904. "Jane Toppan an imbecile." Boston Globe, July 10: 6.—. 1902. "Jane Toppan insane, found not guilty." Boston Globe, June 24: 1.—. 1938. "Jane Toppan, poisoner of 31, dies in hospital at age pf 81." Boston Globe, August 18: 1.—. 1901. "Marriage and money." Boston Globe, November 1: 1.—. 1901. "Murder by poison." Boston Globe, October 31: 1.—. 1901. "No cause for suspicion." Boston Globe, November 4: 2.Lowell Historical Society. 2022. Lowell’s ties to “Jolly” Jane, Massachusetts’ Female Serial Killer. October 29. Accessed March 28, 2024. https://www.lowellhistoricalsociety.org/lowells-ties-to-jolly-jane-massachusetts-female-serial-killer/.New York Times. 1904. "Jane Toppan, an extraordinary case of moral insanity." New York Times, October 23: A2.—. 1938. "Miss Jane Toppan, 84, Mass poisoner, dies." New York Times, August 18: 15.Schechter, Harold. 2012. Fatal: The Poisonous Life of a Female Serial Killer. New York, NY: Pocket Books.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 2 May 2024

Episode 559: The Murder of Timothy Coggins

On the evening of October 9, 1983, twenty-three-year-old Timothy Coggins met up with some friends for a night out at the People’s Choice club, a popular night club in Griffin, Georgia, a rural area about forty-five minutes outside of Atlanta. When Tim didn’t return home the next day, his family assumed he’d stayed at a friend’s house, as he often did on nights he stayed out late. Those assumptions were shattered one day later, when investigators showed up at the Coggins’ front door carrying a photograph of what would be identified as Tim’s dead, mutilated body.At first, local investigators assured the Coggins family they would find whoever was responsible for Tim’s brutal murder; however, within just a couple weeks, it was clear they didn’t have any leads or evidence, nor did they seem all that interested in investigating Tim’s death. Eventually, the months passed into years and the case went completely cold and Tim’s family lost any hope of his killers being brought to justice. Then, more than three decades after his death, investigators contacted the Coggins family and told them they’d found the men responsible for Tim’s death.Timothy Coggins’ story is yet another reminder of how in many parts of the United States, the hideous beliefs of a bygone era are still alive and well, devastating families and perverting the justice system. Thank you to the incredible Dave White of Bring Me the Axe and 99 Cent Rental Podcasts for Research!ReferencesBoone, Christian. 2018. "Well proves crucial in cold murder case." Atlanta Journal Constitution, July 1.—. 2017. "2 boasted of dragging black man behind pickup truck." Atlanta Journal-Constitution, December 1.—. 2018. "Race center stage at trial's opening." Atlanta Journal-Constitution, June 21.Franklin Gebhard v. The State of Georgia. 2019. S19A1582 (Supreme Court of Georgia, December 23).Gomez, Melissa, and Matt Stevens. 2018. "Conviction after 34 years in murder of Black man." New York Times, June 27.Helm, Nelson. 2017. "5 arrested in connection with '83 murder in Spaulding County." Atlanta Constitution, October 14: B1.—. 2017. "Dragging death case was racial." Atlanta Journal-Constitution, November 2.2022. Cold Case Files. Directed by Ricky Lewis. Performed by Ricky Lewis.Lowery, Wesley. 2020. "A Brutal Lynching. An Indifferent Police Force. A 34-Year Wait for Justice." GQ Magazine, July 17.McLaughlin, Eliott C. 2017. "Killers meant to 'send a message,' sheriff says of 1983." CNN Wire, October 20.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 29 April 2024

Episode 558: Listener Tales 85

Weirdos! It's Listener Tales, and they're brought to you BY you, FOR you, FROM you, and ALL ABOUT YOU. This week's episode is brought to you by... DREAMS! We hear about a ghostly soggy nighttime visitor, a story about getting sucked into a void by a dying relation, a dream town with the clocktower, a dream about the previous owner of a house who has passed on, and a weirdo who inadvertently astral projected!If you’ve got a listener tale please send it on over to [email protected] with “Listener Tales” somewhere in the subject line :)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 25 April 2024

Episode 557: The Glove Guy (With Jordan Bonaparte from The Night Time Podcast)

Trigger warning: Please be aware that adult subject matter is discussed within this episode and is not recommended for young listeners. Jordan Bonaparte from the Night Time Podcast joins us to talk about his deep dive into the lore of the nefarious 'Glove Guy'. Initially, he thought the man to be little more than an urban legend and published a post asking for people to tell about their experiences. Men of Halifax, Canada, flooded his inquiry with stories claiming to have EXTREMELY strange late night interactions with the man. The stories are odd, but what Jordan experienced after his podcast released was truly unexpected. Resources:Author unknown. 2016. Warning men of Halifax: The Glove Man. Accessed April 08, 2024. https://www.reddit.com/r/halifax/comments/6qqr7c/warning_men_of_halifax_the_glove_man/.Bonaparte, Jordan. 2024. "The Halifax Glove Guy." Night Time Podcast. Halifax, Nova Scotia, April 11-14. Accessed April 08, 2024. https://www.nighttimepodcast.com/episodes/gloveguy. Jackson Weaver. 2019. How a podcast on Halifax's 'Glove Guy' led to an intellectual property dispute. July 12. Accessed April 08, 2024. https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/nighttime-podcast-name-disputed-1.5203527. Lamoureux, Mack, and MJ Banias. 2019. This Late-Night Glove Salesman Masturbating Story Is Very Weird But Also True. August 30. Accessed April 08, 2024.  https://www.vice.com/en/article/3kxb9n/this-late-night-glove-salesman-masturbating-story-is-very-weird-but-also-true. Love the Gloves. No date. Love the Gloves. Accessed April 08, 2024. https://web.archive.org/web/20180715035720/http://lovethegloves.com/. —. 2013. LoveTheGloves Halifax, Nova Scotia. Accessed April 08, 2024. https://www.youtube.com/@lovethegloveshalifaxnovasc6534?app=desktop.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 22 April 2024

Episode 556: The Santa Rosa Hitchhiker Murders

On the evening of February 4, 1972, middle school friends Maureen Sterling and Yvonne Weber left their homes with a plan to hitchhike to the Redwood Empire Ice Arena in Santa Rosa, California—it was the last time either girl would be seen alive. Nearly one year later, the bodies of Maureen and Yvonne were discovered at the foot of a steep embankment in a rural part of Santa Rosa, identifiable only by the jewelry Maureen had been wearing the night she left the house.  By the time the remains of Sterling and Weber were discovered, three other young women from the Santa Rosa area had gone missing or been found murdered, all of whom had been seen hitchhiking just prior to their disappearance. In time, law enforcement officials would link Sterling and Weber’s murders to the other three woman discovered in 1972, and three others that occurred in the year that followed, all believed to have been killed by the same man or men.  The Santa Rosa hitchhiker murders, as they’re informally known, are one California’s most perplexing cold cases in the state’s history. In addition to the eight women believed to be victims of the same killer, there are several others who disappeared under similar circumstances and could potentially be additional victims. Although there have been several theories as to who was responsible for the deaths, including Ted Bundy and the Zodiac Killer, there has never been any evidence to positively identify the killer. Thank you to the brilliant David White, of the Bring Me the Axe podcast, for research! ReferencesCook, Stephen. 1975. "Death census--young women, hitchhikers, strangulation." San Francisco Examiner, April 25: 24.Dowd, Katie. 2022. "Search continues for Bay Area serial killer who murdered at least 7 women and girls." San Francisco Chronicle, March 13.Fagan, Kevin. 2011. "Ted Bundy a suspect in Sonoma County cold cases." San Francisco Chronicle, July 7.Johnson, Julie, and Randi Rossmann. 2011. "40-year-old mystery." Press Democrat, July 29: 1.LaFever, Matt. 2022. 49 years ago, a southern Humboldt woman was killed on her way home for Christmas. July 21. Accessed March 13, 2024. https://mendofever.com/2022/07/21/49-years-ago-a-southern-humboldt-woman-was-killed-on-her-way-home-for-christmas-by-the-santa-rosa-hitchhiker-murderer/.Press Democrat. 1974. "FBI says nylon rope little help in slaying investigation ." Press Democrat, January 10: 3.—. 1972. "Female hitchhikers and the pain of Kim's mother." Press Democrat, April 27: 1.—. 1972. "Femnale hitchhikers and the pain of Kim's mother." Press Democrat, April 27: 1.—. 1972. "Hitchhiking SRJC coed is missing." Press Democrat, April 27: 1.—. 1972. "Lawmen say woman's killer could be injured." Press Democrat, March 9.—. 1972. "Slain woman was tortured; no identity yet." Press Democrat, March 8.Reid, James. 1973. "$2,000 offered in death of girls." Press Democrat, January 3: 1.—. 1973. "Another slain girl found east of SR." Press Democrat, August 1: 1.—. 1973. "Who is the slain girl found off county road?" Press Democrat, August 2: 1.—. 1975. "Zodiac theory doubted." Press Democrat, April 24: 1.Rossmann, Randi. 1989. "Police don't like to give up on slayings." Press Democrat, March 5: 1.Saludes, Bony. 1973. "Bodies identified as two missing SR girls." Press Democrat, Janaury 1: 1.Sonoma County Sheriff's Office. 1972. Female Homicide Victims Report (Santa Rosa Hitchhiker Murders). Law enforcement, Santa Rosa, CA: Sonoma County Sheriff's Office.United Press International. 1973. "Officers seek link in deaths of 5 girls." Los Angeles Times, August 17: 3.Volkerts, Art. 1972. "Secret witness--can you help solve a crime?" Press Democrat, December 27: 1.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 18 April 2024

Episode 555: Ed Gein: The Butcher of Plainfield (Part 3)

What drove the mild-mannered farmer to commit such hideous and depraved acts in America’s heartland, and why do people from around the world continue to find him so infamous? Thank you to the magical Dave White of Bring Me the Axe Podcast for research! ReferencesAssociated Press. 1968. "Gein prosecution winds up murder testimony." Capital Times, November 9: 9.—. 1968. "Gein ruled fit to stand trial." Green Bay Press-Gazette, January 16: 1.Capital Times. 1958. "Bar Gein house admission fees." Capital Times, March 12: 4.—. 1957. "Claims ten skulls came from graves ." Capital Times, November 18: 1.—. 1958. "Gein insane, psychiatrist tells court." Capital Times, January 6: 3.—. 1957. "Nearly wed gein, woman reveals." Capital Times, November 20: 1.—. 1957. "Plan to open at least two." Capital Times, November 23: 1.—. 1957. "Weeping Gein joins minister in prayer." Capital Times, November 22: 1.—. 1957. "'Won't believe' graves robbed ." Capital Times, November 19: 1.Daily Tribune. 1954. "Believe Bancroft tavernkeeper was slain." Daily Tribune, December 9: 1.—. 1944. "Rites today for the man who died in Roche-a-Cri fire." Daily Tribune, May 19: 1.Engel, Dave. 2005. "Whatever happened to Mary Hogan?" Daily Tribune, December 5: 6.La Crosse Tribune. 1957. "State pushes murder charges against ." La Crosse Tribune, November 22: 1.Portage Daily Register. 1957. "New rifle in shop used in slaying storekeeper." Portage Daily Register, November 19: 1.Schechter, Harold. 1998. Deviant: The Shocking True Story of Ed Gein, the Original Psycho. New York, NY: Gallery Books.Stevens Point Journal. 1958. "Ed Gein's real estate sold for under $4,000." Stevens Point Journal, March 31: 1.—. 1958. "Gein farmhouse leveled by early morning blaze." Stevens Point Journal, March 20: 1.—. 1958. "Open house at Gein farm draws crowds." Stevens Point Journal, March 24: 1.—. 1957. "Results of lie test announced." Stevens Point Journal, November 20: 1.—. 1954. "Woman's disappearance hints slaying at Pine Grove tavern." Stevens Point Journal, December 9: 1.United Press. 1957. "Hospital gets ready for Gein." Capital Times, November 23: 2.United Press International. 1968. "Ed Gein found guilty of 1957 murder in Plainfield." Capital Times, November 14: 2.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 15 April 2024

Episode 554: Ed Gein: The Butcher of Plainfield (Part 2)

When hardware store owner Bernice Worden disappeared from her store on the morning of November 16, 1957, sheriff’s deputies traced the last sale made that morning to fifty-one-year-old recluse and occasional handyman Ed Gein. During a cursory search of the Gein property, investigators quickly located Worden’s decapitated and mutilated body in a shed on Gein’s property, but that was only one of the many horrors that awaited them on the farmstead. Inside the house, deputies found one of the most shocking and horrifying scenes ever documented in the history of American crime, revealing that the mild-mannered handyman locals had always believed harmless, was in fact a profoundly psychotic killer. Thank you to the magnificent Dave White of Bring Me the Axe Podcast for research! ReferencesAssociated Press. 1968. "Gein prosecution winds up murder testimony." Capital Times, November 9: 9.—. 1968. "Gein ruled fit to stand trial." Green Bay Press-Gazette, January 16: 1.Capital Times. 1958. "Bar Gein house admission fees." Capital Times, March 12: 4.—. 1957. "Claims ten skulls came from graves ." Capital Times, November 18: 1.—. 1958. "Gein insane, psychiatrist tells court." Capital Times, January 6: 3.—. 1957. "Nearly wed gein, woman reveals." Capital Times, November 20: 1.—. 1957. "Plan to open at least two." Capital Times, November 23: 1.—. 1957. "Weeping Gein joins minister in prayer." Capital Times, November 22: 1.—. 1957. "'Won't believe' graves robbed ." Capital Times, November 19: 1.Daily Tribune. 1954. "Believe Bancroft tavernkeeper was slain." Daily Tribune, December 9: 1.—. 1944. "Rites today for the man who died in Roche-a-Cri fire." Daily Tribune, May 19: 1.Engel, Dave. 2005. "Whatever happened to Mary Hogan?" Daily Tribune, December 5: 6.La Crosse Tribune. 1957. "State pushes murder charges against ." La Crosse Tribune, November 22: 1.Portage Daily Register. 1957. "New rifle in shop used in slaying storekeeper." Portage Daily Register, November 19: 1.Schechter, Harold. 1998. Deviant: The Shocking True Story of Ed Gein, the Original Psycho. New York, NY: Gallery Books.Stevens Point Journal. 1958. "Ed Gein's real estate sold for under $4,000." Stevens Point Journal, March 31: 1.—. 1958. "Gein farmhouse leveled by early morning blaze." Stevens Point Journal, March 20: 1.—. 1958. "Open house at Gein farm draws crowds." Stevens Point Journal, March 24: 1.—. 1957. "Results of lie test announced." Stevens Point Journal, November 20: 1.—. 1954. "Woman's disappearance hints slaying at Pine Grove tavern." Stevens Point Journal, December 9: 1.United Press. 1957. "Hospital gets ready for Gein." Capital Times, November 23: 2.United Press International. 1968. "Ed Gein found guilty of 1957 murder in Plainfield." Capital Times, November 14: 2.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 11 April 2024

Episode 553: Ed Gein: The Butcher of Plainfield (Part 1)

Not since Jack the Ripper or H.H. Holmes had a criminal so thoroughly shocked and captivated the public imagination; yet Gein’s crimes went far beyond what anyone imagined a person could be capable of. Indeed, he has served as the basis for some of Hollywood’s most iconic horror films including Psycho, Silence of the Lambs, and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. And, while he is only known to have killed two people during his active period, the list of crimes he is suspected of having committed is long and likely to remain a source of speculation for a long time to come. Thank you to the magical Dave White of Bring Me the Axe Podcast for research! ReferencesAssociated Press. 1968. "Gein prosecution winds up murder testimony." Capital Times, November 9: 9.—. 1968. "Gein ruled fit to stand trial." Green Bay Press-Gazette, January 16: 1.Capital Times. 1958. "Bar Gein house admission fees." Capital Times, March 12: 4.—. 1957. "Claims ten skulls came from graves ." Capital Times, November 18: 1.—. 1958. "Gein insane, psychiatrist tells court." Capital Times, January 6: 3.—. 1957. "Nearly wed gein, woman reveals." Capital Times, November 20: 1.—. 1957. "Plan to open at least two." Capital Times, November 23: 1.—. 1957. "Weeping Gein joins minister in prayer." Capital Times, November 22: 1.—. 1957. "'Won't believe' graves robbed ." Capital Times, November 19: 1.Daily Tribune. 1954. "Believe Bancroft tavernkeeper was slain." Daily Tribune, December 9: 1.—. 1944. "Rites today for the man who died in Roche-a-Cri fire." Daily Tribune, May 19: 1.Engel, Dave. 2005. "Whatever happened to Mary Hogan?" Daily Tribune, December 5: 6.La Crosse Tribune. 1957. "State pushes murder charges against ." La Crosse Tribune, November 22: 1.Portage Daily Register. 1957. "New rifle in shop used in slaying storekeeper." Portage Daily Register, November 19: 1.Schechter, Harold. 1998. Deviant: The Shocking True Story of Ed Gein, the Original Psycho. New York, NY: Gallery Books.Stevens Point Journal. 1958. "Ed Gein's real estate sold for under $4,000." Stevens Point Journal, March 31: 1.—. 1958. "Gein farmhouse leveled by early morning blaze." Stevens Point Journal, March 20: 1.—. 1958. "Open house at Gein farm draws crowds." Stevens Point Journal, March 24: 1.—. 1957. "Results of lie test announced." Stevens Point Journal, November 20: 1.—. 1954. "Woman's disappearance hints slaying at Pine Grove tavern." Stevens Point Journal, December 9: 1.United Press. 1957. "Hospital gets ready for Gein." Capital Times, November 23: 2.United Press International. 1968. "Ed Gein found guilty of 1957 murder in Plainfield." Capital Times, November 14: 2.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 8 April 2024

Episode 552: Marie Robards

When thirty-eight-year-old Steven Robards died unexpectedly in the winter of 1993, everyone including the coroner believed his death to have been the result of a heart attack—unusual for someone so young, but certainly not unheard of. It wasn’t until the following year, when Steven’s teenage daughter, Marie, was practicing for the school play, that the girl confessed the truth to her friend: Steven Robards didn’t die from a heart attack, he was murdered by his daughter with chemicals she’d stolen from the high school chemistry lab.In the United States, it’s exceedingly rare for a child to kill a parent, and rarer still for that child to be female. The truth about Steven Robards murder shocked the residents of the Fort Worth area and divided the community between those who were sympathetic to her claims of desperation and those who saw her as nothing more than a craven predator who’d do anything to get what she wanted. Indeed, Marie claimed she had only wanted to make her father sick so she could return to living with her mother, from whom she’d been separated since her parents’ divorce, and she had never wanted to kill him.Ultimately a jury didn’t buy Marie’s story and sentenced her to twenty-seven years in prison, of which she served only seven years before being paroled. Was Marie Robards really just a confused teenager who acted impulsive without regard for the consequences of her actions? Or was she really the calculating self-serving killer some believed her to be?Thank you to David White, of the Bring Me the Axe podcast, for research assistance!ReferencesBlaney, Betsy. 1997. "Trial near for NRH teen accused of killing father." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, August 17: 1.Cochran, Mike. 1996. "Ex-UT student headed for patricide trial." Austin American-Statesman, May 6: 11.—. 1996. "Teen says she didn't mean to kill dad." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, May 6: 1.Hanna, Bill, and Kathy Sanders. 1994. "Daughter appears in court." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, October 20: 21.Hollandsworth, Skip. 1996. "Poisoning Daddy." Texas Monthly, July 01.Hood County News. 1994. "City staff's reactions mixed on poison suspect's presence." Hood County News, November 2: 1.Vozzella, Laura. 1996. "Accused dreamed of being coroner, prosecutor says." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, May 8: 50.—. 1996. "Chemistry student gets 28-year term in father's death." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, May 11: 1.—. 1996. "Teen is found guilty of poisoning her father." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, May 10: 15.—. 1996. "Teacher says chemical hidden from police." Fort Worth Star-Telegraph, May 9: 21.2001. Forensic Files. Directed by David Wasser. Performed by David Wasser. Alaina's 2nd book in the Dr Wren Muller Series, THE BUTCHER GAME will be released on September 17th, 2024! To Pre-order go to (https://zandoprojects.com/books/the-butcher-game/) PLUS! If you preorder the book, get an autographed poster while supplies last by visiting (http://thebutchergame.com/)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 4 April 2024

Episode 551: Happy Land Social Club Arson

On the evening of March 24, 1990, nearly one hundred patrons gathered to celebrate Carnivale at the Happy Land Social Club, a small informal night club in the Bronx that catered to a mostly Honduran clientele. The evening took a deadly turn when, around 3:30 am, an explosion of fire roared up the stairway leading to the second-floor club, blocking the only exit from the building and trapping the patrons in a room rapidly filling with toxic smoke and fire. It’s unknown how many patrons managed to escape the fire, but by the time the fire department had extinguished the blaze, eighty-seven people were dead. Thank you to the amazing Dave White of Bring Me the Axe Podcast for research! ReferencesBarbanel, Josh. 1990. "Bronx social club's sublease: How a firetrap skirted the line." New York Times, March 28: B1.—. 1990. "Tracing the club's owners." New York Times, March 27: B2.Barron, James. 1990. "The living search the faces of the dead." New York Times, March 26.Blumenthal, Ralph. 1990. "Fire in the Bronx; 87 die in blaze at illegal club." New York Times, March 26.Gelman, Mitch, Alexis Jetter, and Beth Holland. 1990. "87 die in arson called act of spurned lover." Newsday, March 26: 3.Gilbert, Allison. 2020. "A faded tragedy's long shadow." New York Times, March 29.Golden, Tim. 1990. "In the saddest way, New York learns about Hondurans." New York Times, April 1.Hernandez, Raymond. 1995. "Survivors call settlement 'unjust'." New York Times, July 7.Hevesi, Dennis. 1992. "Guilty plea by landlord in fire case." New York Times, May 9.Hirsch, James. 1988. "Most social clubs run the gamut of illegality." New York Times, August 22.Kerr, Peter. 1986. "Social Clubs: Modern Mob still uses a few as offices." New York Times, April 15.Lambert, Bruce. 1991. "Confession tape on Bronx blaze is heard by jury." New York Times, August 1.Lorch, Donatella. 1991. "Ex-girlfriend recalls threat before flames." New York Times, July 31.—. 1991. "Witness tells of visit by Happy Land fire suspect." New York Times, July 31.Maykuth, Andrew. 1990. "N.Y. fire suspect described as 'down to his last hope'." Philadelphia Inquirer, 03 27: 1.McFadden, Robert. 1990. "The Knights of the Padlock Sweep Forth." New York Times, March 31.New York Times. 1990. "7 victims: their stories, struggles and dreams of better lives." New York Times, March 29.Nieves, Evelyn. 1991. "Refugee found guilty of killing 87 in Bronx Happy Land fire." New York Times, August 20.People of the State of New York v. Julio Gonzalez. 1995. 163 Misc. 2d 950 (New York Supreme Court, Bronx County, February 10).Purdy, Matthew. 1995. "More than five years after the arson fire at the Happy Land Social Club..." New York Times, July 7.Roberts, Sam. 2016. "Julio Gonzalez, arsonist who killed 87 at a nightclub in the Bronx, dies at 61." New York Times, September 15.Schanberg, Sydney. 1990. "Please, some respect for 87 who died." Newsday, April 13: 62.Stanley, Alessandra. 1991. "At Happy Land mass-murder trial, days of tears, humor and boredom." New York Times, July 28.Stanley, Allessandra. 1990. "25 years to life for the arsonist at Happy Land." New York Times, September 20.Strom, Stephanie. 1990. "Hispanic residents rally against closing of social clubs." New York Times, April 6.Terry, Don. 1990. "Social club crackdown is the latest in a series." New York Times, March 26: A1.Wichers, Christine. 1990. "Male violence the real cause of Bronx fire." New York Times, April 10. THE BUTCHER GAME will be released on September 17th, 2024! To Pre-order go to (https://zandoprojects.com/books/the-butcher-game/) PLUS! If you preorder the book, get an autographed poster while supplies last by visiting (http://thebutchergame.com/)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 1 April 2024

Episode 550: Listener Tales 84

BIG, BIG NEWS AHEAD!!!! We are SO excited to announce that The SEQUEL, yes, the 2nd book of The Dr. Wren Muller Series- THE BUTCHER GAME will be released on September 17th, 2024! To Pre-order go to https://zandoprojects.com/books/the-butcher-game/ (https://zandoprojects.com/books/the-butcher-game/) PLUS! If you preorder the book, get an autographed poster while supplies last by visiting thebutchergame.com (http://thebutchergame.com/) Also-- IT'S LISTENER TALES!!!!! And this month's episode is brought to you by gut feelings! In this episode, we hear about a ghostly visitor during an awkwardly intimate moment, a run in an elderly couple near an abandoned asylum, a portal to Marrakesh in a Weirdo's room, a UFO sighting on a beach, and a weird encounter with a car in a ditch!If you’ve got a listener tale please send it on over to [email protected] with “Listener Tales” somewhere in the subject line :)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 28 March 2024

Episode 549: The Lipstick Killer (Part 2)

The brutal murders of Ross, Brown, and Degnan shocked the city of Chicago and terrified and outraged the city’s residents, who wanted only to feel safe once again. Under intense pressure from the press, the public, and city officials, investigators were desperate to catch the killer and solve the case by any means necessary, even if they had to break more than a few rules and ignore some inconvenient facts in order to do it. Thank you to the incredible Dave white of Bring Me the Axe & 99 Cent Rental Podcast for research!References Amended Petition for Executive Clemency. 2002. C-06103 (Illinois Prisoner Review Board, April). Arizona Republic . 1946. "Defendant fails in plea to jury." Arizona Republic, June 20: 18. Banks, Joe. 1946. "Prisoner says he killed girl." Tucson Daily Citizen, June 26: 1. Chicago Tribune. 1946. "Police resift all clues in Degnan case." Chcago Tribune, January 12: 1. —. 1946. "2 rewards offered for 'execution' of girl's kidnap-slayer." Chicago Tribune, January 8: 2. —. 1946. "Call Heirens sane; today's plea in doubt." Chicago Tribune, September 4: 1. —. 1946. "Child stolen from her bed during the night." Chicago Tribune, January 8: 1. —. 1945. "Ex-WAVE slain, plea written in red on wall." Chicago Tribune, December 11: 1. —. 1946. "Handwriting similarity to killer's shown." Chicago Tribune, June 27: 1. —. 1946. "Heirens gets new grilling following 'futile' lie test." Chicago Tribune, July 1: 1. —. 1946. "Heirens made choice of plea, attorneys say." Chicago Tribune, August 7: 12. —. 1946. "Murders, assaults, thefts, shooting; Heirens' story." Chicago Tribune, August 7: 1. —. 1945. "Mystery grows in WAVE slaying." Chicago Tribune, December 12: 1. —. 1943. "Organize posse of tenants and catch prowler." Chicago Tribune, August 9: 18. —. 1946. "Repudiates his 'confession' in Degnan slaying." Chicago Tribune, June 29: 6. —. 1946. "Student held in Degnan case puzzles police." Chicago Tribune, June 29: 1. —. 1946. "Tubs in basement, saw and ax held best clews." Chicago Tribune, January 9: 1. —. 1946. "U.C. Sophomore, facing police quiz, fakes coma." Chicago Tribune, June 29: 1. —. 1946. "Use of serum in Heirens quiz still mystery." Chicago Tribune, July 1: 5. —. 1945. "Widow is found in home; suitor quizzed." Chicago Tribune, June 6: 10. Decatur Daily Review. 1946. "Chicago girl kidnapped; note demands $20,000." Decatur Daily Review, January 7: 1. —. 1946. "Janitors grilled in kidnap-death." Decatur Daily Review, January 9: 1. Decatur Herald. 1945. "Brutal WAVE slayer sought." Decatur Herald, December 12: 1. Higgins, Michael. 2007. "1940s killer denied parole." Chicago Tribune, August 3: 1. —. 2007. "Is 61 years in prison enough retribution." Chicago Tribune, July 29: 1. Kennedy, Dolores. 1991. William Heirens: His Day in Court. New York, NY: Bonus Books. New York Times. 1946. "Heirens confesses in no-chair deal." New York Times, August 7: 36. Pantagraph. 1945. "Former Wave found brutally slain in Chicago bathtub." Pantagraph, December 10: 1. People of the State of Illinois v William Heirens. 1954. 33165 (Supreme Court of Illinois, September 23). People of the State of Illinois v William Heirens. 1995. 1-90-2240 (Appellate Court of the State of Illinois, March 15). Priddy, Gladys. 1945. "Slain ex-WAVE a friend to all, roomate says." Chicago Tribune, December 14: 3.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 25 March 2024

Episode 548: The Lipstick Killer (Part 1)

BIG, BIG NEWS AHEAD!!!! We are SO excited to announce that The SEQUEL, yes, the 2nd book of The Dr. Wren Muller Series will be released on September 17th, 2024! To Pre-order go to https://zandoprojects.com/books/the-butcher-game/ PLUS! If you preorder the book, get an autographed poster while supplies last by visiting thebutchergame.com. On June 5, 1945, forty-three-year-old Josephine Ross was found stabbed to death in her Chicago apartment. Nothing had been stolen from Ross’ apartment and it appeared as though there were ritualistic aspects to the murder, but with little evidence and no suspects, the case hit a dead end almost as soon as it started. Ross’ murder came to detectives’ minds six months later, when another Chicago woman, Frances Brown, was found murdered in her apartment. This time an ominous message was scrawled on the wall in red lipstick: “For heavens sake catch me before I kill more I cannot control myself.” The brutal nature of the two murders, and the implication that the killer would strike again, terrified the women of Chicago, and that fear was stoked by the city’s five major newspapers, who were in a daily battle for readers’ attention. The story reached a fever pitch just one month later when six-year-old Suzanne Degnan was abducted from her bedroom by someone who’d entered through an open window. Despite the presence of a ransom note demanding $20,000, investigators discovered Degnan’s dismembered body in the sewer a short time later.Thank you to the incredible Dave white of Bring Me the Axe & 99 Cent Rental Podcast for research!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 21 March 2024

Episode 547: Lizzie Borden and other Dark Nursery Rhymes (with Special Guests Sabrina & Corinne from Two Girls One Ghost)

Sabrina & Corinne from Two Girls One Ghost join us on this week's episode to talk about the dark histories behind childhood nursery rhymes. Fresh off of our ghost hunting experience at the Lizzie Borden house, we talk about the childhood rhyme and where it went wrong, as well as talk about others that SEEMED so innocent! Don't forget to check the episode on the Two Girls One Ghost feed where we talk about our ghost hunting experiences! It was WILD! Thank you to the wonderful Dave White of Bring me the Axe Podcast for research! ReferencesBurton-Hill, Clemency. 2015. The dark side of nursery rhymes. June 10. Accessed February 6, 2024. https://www.bbc.com/culture/article/20150610-the-dark-side-of-nursery-rhymes.Hazlett, Lisa A. 2009. "The use of British nursery rhymes and contemporary technology as venues for creating and expressing hidden literacies throughout time by children, adolescents, and adults." Forum on Public Policy: A Journal of the Oxford Round Table. Opie, Iona, and Peter Opie. 1952. The Oxofrd Dictionary of Nursery Rhymes. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.Roberts, Chris. 2005. Heavy Words Lightly Thrown: The Reason Behind the Rhyme. Sheridan, WY: Gotham Books.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 18 March 2024

Episode 546: Matthew Wales and the Society Murders

When millionaire Australian socialite Margaret Wales-King and her husband, Paul King, disappeared in April 2002, friends and family became concerned something serious had happened to the older couple. Those fears and concerns were confirmed a few weeks later, when park rangers discovered their bodies in a shallow grave in Marysville, Victoria. Margaret and her husband had been clubbed and strangled to death. The press dubbed the murders “the society killings” and the tragedy captured the Australian public’s attention for the ways it seemed to have been pulled right out of a classic mystery novel. Yet for all the couple’s wealth, nothing appeared to be missing from their home and their bodies were discovered still wearing jewelry and in possession of credit cards and other valuables. Under the circumstances, police looked to Wales-King’s children, who stood to gain a great deal of money in the event of Margaret’s death. Within a week the case started to come together, and a suspect was revealed. While most of the family responded to the Wales-King murders in a manner one would expect, thirty-four-year-old Matthew Wales behavior was erratic, explosive, and suspicious. Upon interviewing Matthew, investigators learned he was the last person to have seen his mother and stepfather the night they were murdered, after having dinner with Matthew and his wife, Maritza. A few weeks later, after multiple interviews, Matthew Wales confessed to murdering his parents; though why he had done it came as a shock to everyone who knew the family. ReferencesAnderson, Paul, Philip Cullen, and Mark Butler. 2002. "Bodies of missing couple in shallow grave." Advertiser, May 1.Bonney, Hilary. 2003. The Society Murders: The true story of the Wales-King murders. Crows Nest, Australia: Allen and Unwin.Clifton, Brad. 2002. "From high society to a grave in the bush." Daily Telegraph, May 4.Daily Telegraph. 2002. "Son guilty of family killing." Daily Telegraph, October 18.Green, Sue. 2002. "Crowds gather as search unfolds - son, wife charged over murders." Daily Telegraph, May 13.Medew, Julia. 2007. "Wife of 'society murderer' avoids jail on ring theft." The Age, February 21.Monroe, Ian. 2002. "The wayward youngest son." The Age, October 18.Murphy, Padric. 2002. "Couple's disappearance baffles police." The Age, April 11.Ross, Norrie, and Mark Buttler. 2003. "Death family vendetta, wife of killer brother will not profit." The Mercury, April 12.Silvester, John. 2003. "Murder in the Family." The Age, April 11.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 14 March 2024

Episode 545: The Career Girl Murders (Part 2)

While the tragic loss of two young lives was particularly shocking, the Career Girl Murders is better remembered as one of the most egregious cases of police coercion and abuse in the state’s history. Eight months after the murder, investigators arrested nineteen-year-old George Whitmore, an intellectually disabled day laborer from whom they elicited a false confession, not only for the murder of Hoffert and Wylie, but also for the murder of a single mother in Brooklyn. Eight more months would pass before the charges against Whitmore were dropped, and several more years before police arrested Wylie and Hoffert’s real killer, twenty-two-year-old drug addict and burglar Richard Robles. The murders of Emily Hoffert and Janice Wylie were just two of several high-profile New York City murders that reshaped how wealthy and middle-class white people thought of urban life in the 1960s. More importantly, however, it’s more important legacy is the extent to which it shined a light on how race and class can influence a police investigation and jury verdict, and how justice can be delayed or diverted in the interest of efficiency and the illusion of safety.ReferencesAnderson, David. 1965. "Jury that convicted Whitmore to be questioned on race bias." New York Times, January 15: 19.Bigart, Homer. 1963. "Killing of 2 girls yields no clue; police question 500 in a month." New York Times, September 27: 1.Buckley, Thomas. 1964. "Youth is accused in Wylie slaying." New York Times, April 26: 1.Clark, Alfred E. 1963. "Girl got phone threats 10 days before murder." New York Times, August 30: 13.Gansberg, Martin. 1964. "East Side tenants sigh in relief at capture of slaying suspect." New York Times, April 27: 21.Johnson, Marilynn S. 2011. "The Career Girl Murders: Gender, Race, and Crime in 1960s New York." Women's Studies Quarerly (The Feminist Press at City University of New York) 244-261.Jones, Theodore. 1965. "Jury finds Robles guilty in Wylie-Hoffert killings." New York Times, December 2: 1.—. 1965. "Witness says Robles pondered murdering girls." New York Times, November 4: 40.Kihiss, Peter. 1964. "Brooklyn indicts 3-slaying suspect." New York Times, April 29: 48.Lefkowitz, Bernard, and Ken Gross. 1969. The Victims: The Wylie-Hoffert Murder Case and its Strange Aftermath. New York, NY: Putnam.National Registry of Exonerations. n.d. George Whitmore, Jr. Accessed January 17, 2024. https://www.law.umich.edu/special/exoneration/Pages/casedetailpre1989.aspx?caseid=358.New York Times. 1963. "2 girls murdered in E. 88th St. flat." New York Times, August 29: 1.—. 1975. "Max Wylie, writer, murder victim's father, is suicide." New York Times, September 23: 24.—. 1946. "Suspect in slaying of 2 career girls found sane here." New York Times, October 17: 31.—. 1964. "Whitmore guilty of rape attempt in Brooklyn case." New York Times, November 19: 43.Roth, Jack. 1965. "Trial fading out in Wylie murder." New York Times, January 22: 17.The People of the State of New York, v. Richard Robles. 1970. 27 N.Y.2d 155 (Court of Appeals of the State of New York, September 24).Tolchin, Martin. 1964. "Victim describes Brooklyn attack." New York Times, November 13: 30.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 11 March 2024

Episode 544: The Career Girl Murders (Part 1)

On August 28, 1963, Patricia Tolles returned home from work to find her New York City apartment ransacked, a bloody knife in the bathroom, and her roommates, Emily Hoffert and Janice Wylie, nowhere to be found. Patricia went to the lobby and called Janice’s father, Max Wylie, who came over immediately and searched the apartment, finding the bodies of his daughter and Hoffert in one of the bedrooms. Labeled by the press as the “Career Girl Murders,” the murders of Wylie and Hoffert shook the relatively quiet Upper East Side neighborhood and left many residents—particularly young women—feeling vulnerable and afraid.  Thank you to the wondrous Dave White of Bring me the Axe Podcast for research! ReferencesAnderson, David. 1965. "Jury that convicted Whitmore to be questioned on race bias." New York Times, January 15: 19.Bigart, Homer. 1963. "Killing of 2 girls yields no clue; police question 500 in a month." New York Times, September 27: 1.Buckley, Thomas. 1964. "Youth is accused in Wylie slaying." New York Times, April 26: 1.Clark, Alfred E. 1963. "Girl got phone threats 10 days before murder." New York Times, August 30: 13.Gansberg, Martin. 1964. "East Side tenants sigh in relief at capture of slaying suspect." New York Times, April 27: 21.Johnson, Marilynn S. 2011. "The Career Girl Murders: Gender, Race, and Crime in 1960s New York." Women's Studies Quarerly (The Feminist Press at City University of New York) 244-261.Jones, Theodore. 1965. "Jury finds Robles guilty in Wylie-Hoffert killings." New York Times, December 2: 1.—. 1965. "Witness says Robles pondered murdering girls." New York Times, November 4: 40.Kihiss, Peter. 1964. "Brooklyn indicts 3-slaying suspect." New York Times, April 29: 48.Lefkowitz, Bernard, and Ken Gross. 1969. The Victims: The Wylie-Hoffert Murder Case and its Strange Aftermath. New York, NY: Putnam.National Registry of Exonerations. n.d. George Whitmore, Jr. Accessed January 17, 2024. https://www.law.umich.edu/special/exoneration/Pages/casedetailpre1989.aspx?caseid=358.New York Times. 1963. "2 girls murdered in E. 88th St. flat." New York Times, August 29: 1.—. 1975. "Max Wylie, writer, murder victim's father, is suicide." New York Times, September 23: 24.—. 1946. "Suspect in slaying of 2 career girls found sane here." New York Times, October 17: 31.—. 1964. "Whitmore guilty of rape attempt in Brooklyn case." New York Times, November 19: 43.Roth, Jack. 1965. "Trial fading out in Wylie murder." New York Times, January 22: 17.The People of the State of New York, v. Richard Robles. 1970. 27 N.Y.2d 155 (Court of Appeals of the State of New York, September 24).Tolchin, Martin. 1964. "Victim describes Brooklyn attack." New York Times, November 13: 30.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 7 March 2024

Episode 543: The Execution of Hamida Djandoubi (with Special Guests Alvin & Fran From Affirmative Murder Podcast)

Alvin & Fran from Affirmative Murder Podcast join us today to tell us about the execution of Hamida Djandoubi. On September 10th, 1977, Djandoubi's execution sentence was carried out by Guillotine, and marked the last time it was used for capital punishment in the western world. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 4 March 2024

Episode 542: Listener Tales 83

Weirdos! Get cozy and get ready to listen to our 83rd batch of Listener Tales! They're brought to you BY you, FOR you, FROM you, and ALL ABOUT YOU! In this episode we have a family of witchy women, get visits from spirits of four-legged family who passed over the rainbow bridge, abandon a morally tainted valentine birthday cake, and get AGGRESSIVELY RSVP'd by an entity from another realm!<3If you’ve got a listener tale please send it on over to [email protected] with “Listener Tales” somewhere in the subject line :)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 29 February 2024

Episode 541: The Unsolved Murder of Georgette Bauerdorf

On the morning of October 12, 1944, Lulu Atwood arrived at the El Palacio Apartments in West Hollywood, where she worked cleaning apartments for wealthy and celebrity clients. When Lulu reached the apartment of twenty-year-old Georgette Bauerdorf, she called out and when she got no reply, she entered the apartment to begin her work. Inside, Lulu could hear the water running in the bathtub upstairs, and when she made her way to the second-floor bathroom, she found the dead body of Georgette Bauerdorf half-submerged in the water.As a well-known socialite and the prominent daughter of a wealthy oil tycoon, Georgette’s untimely death surprised the Los Angeles society circles in which she moved. But when her death was officially labeled a murder, and one with sexual overtones, their surprise turned to shock and dismay—who would have wanted to kill Georgette Bauerdorf and why?As a member of Hollywood’s elite class, Georgette Bauerdorf’s murder dominated the headlines of Los Angeles papers for weeks, but when the leads dried up just a few weeks later and no new suspects were identified, the case went cold and by the end of the year the investigation was essentially shelved. Once considered alongside the Black Dahlia as one of Los Angeles’ most notorious unsolved murders, today the story of Georgette Bauerdorf has now all but faded from public memory, making it unlikely the mystery will ever be solved. Thank you to David White, of The Bring Me the Axe Podcast, for research!ReferencesBuffalo Evening News. 1944. "Murder theory studied in death of wealthy girl." Buffalo Evening News, October 13: 1.Dowd, Katie. 2021. "A California oil heiress was strangled in her apartment. Who got away with murder?" SF Gate, November 28.Foster, Ernest. 1944. "Heiress found dead in bathtub mystery." Daily News, October 13: 224.Los Angeles Times. 1944. "Evidence shows heiress waged terrific fight." Los Angeles Times, October 15: 3.—. 1944. "Ex-soldiers tale of killing heiress here discounted." Los Angeles Times, December 29: 6.—. 1944. "Girl mystery death laid to attacker." Los Angeles Times, October 14: 1.—. 1944. "Girl mystery death laid to attacker." Los Angeles Times, October 14: 1.—. 1945. "Note professing Bauerdorf girl slaying knowledge pondered." Los Angeles Times, September 21: 2.—. 1944. "Oil heiress death clues valueless, deputies say." Los Angeles Times, October 17: 5.—. 1945. "Self-appointed sleuth held in heiress' death." Los Angeles Times, September 25: 2.—. 1944. "Tale of killing heiress here false, ex-soldier concedes." Los Angeles Times, December 30: 11.New York Times. 1944. "Miss Bauerdorf, oil man's daughter, slain by strangler in her Hollywood apartment." New York Times, October 14: 15.San Francisco Examiner . 1944. "Heiress' generosity believed to have led to her murder ." San Francisco Examiner , October 15: 3.San Francisco Examiner. 1944. "Hollywood girl believed strangled far from home." San Francisco Examiner, October 20: 3.—. 1944. "New theory in girl slaying." San Francisco Examiner, October 27: 15.—. 1944. "Police reject confession." San Francisco Examiner, December 30: 24.—. 1944. "Slaying of Oil Heiress in Hollywood confessed." San Francisco Examiner, December 29: 3.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 26 February 2024

Episode 540: Anna George and the Murder of George Saxton

 On the evening of October 6, 1898, forty-eight-year-old George Saxton, brother of First Lady Ida McKinley, was riding his bike to the home of his lady friend Eva Althouse when an assailant dressed in black emerged from the shadows and fired two shots. Wounded, George crawled towards Eva’s house and had just reached the front steps when the shooter approached and fired two more shots, killing him almost instantly.Within hours of Saxton’s death, his former mistress, Anna George, was arrested and charged with first-degree murder. For more than a decade, Saxton and George had been carrying on a scandalous relationship that began as an illicit affair until Saxton successfully convinced George to divorce her husband, supposedly with promises to marry her. However, once she was a single woman again, Saxton’s enthusiasm for marriage had cooled and over time his interest in Anna waned. Anna George’s sensational arrest and trial dominated headlines for months and, as Saxton was extremely unpopular, many people sympathized with the accused woman and even reveled in Saxton’s death. After an intense and closely watched three-week trial, Anna George was acquitted of the murder and soon after she faded out of the spotlight, leaving the murder of George Saxton officially unsolved to this day. Thank you to the glorious David White, of the Bring Me The Axe Podcast, for research! ReferencesAkron Beacon Journal. 1906. "Former Akron man suicided in Ravenna." Akron Beacon Journal, July 23: 8.Bellamy, John Stark. 2011. A Woman Scorned: The Murder of George Saxton. Cleveland, OH: Independent.Boston Daily Globe. 1899. "Mintz on Saxton." Boston Daily Globe, April 23: 2.—. 1898. "Public sympathy with Mrs. George." Boston Daily Globe, October 9: 1.Cincinnati Post. 1898. "Before bar of justice." Cincinnati Post, October 10: 1.—. 1898. "Charged with murder of G.D. Saxton." Cincinnati Post, October 11: 1.Clinton County Democrat. 1898. "The good people of Canton rejoice that he has been removed." Clinton County Democrat, November 10: 1.Coe, Jonathan. 2012. Canton's Great Tragedy the Murder of George D. Saxton, Together with a History of the Arrest and Trial of Annie E. George Charged with the Murder. Detroit, MI: Gale.Dayton Daily News. 1899. "Loved to the hour of death." Dayton Daily News, April 8: 1.Dayton Herald. 1899. "Relations of Mrs. George and Saxton are told to the jury." Dayton Herald, April 8: 1.—. 1899. "Youth claims to have seen the killing of Saxton." Dayton Herald, July 25: 1.New York Times. 1899. "Belated evidence heard at Chicago against Mrs. George." New York Times, July 25: 4.Scripps-McRae Telegram. 1898. "Out of court noted alienation case was settled." Cincinnati Post, October 5: 7.Stark County Democrat. 1899. "Sterling were the remarks of the attorney by the same name." Stark County Democrat, April 27: 1.—. 1899. "Testimony being heard at a rapid and exceedingly gratifying pace." Stark County Democvrat, April 13: 1. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 22 February 2024

Episode 539: Ronald Dominique: The Bayou Strangler (Part 3)

(Part 3) In the spring of 2005, law enforcement officials in southern Louisiana had a growing number of murder victims they had begun to suspect were connected to an unidentified serial killer operating in the area. The victims were all men, mostly in their twenties and thirties, many had histories of drug and alcohol abuse or were known to police as sex-workers, and all had been strangled and dumped in secondary locations. Over the course of a decade, Ronald Dominique developed into one of the worst and most prolific serial killers in American history; yet his story and those of his victims remains largely unknown and ignored by the mainstream media.  Thank you to the Incredible Dave White of Bring Me the Axe & 99 Cent Renal Podcasts for research! ReferencesAlford, Jeremy. 2005. New information coming soon in local murders. August 24. Accessed March 29, 2023. https://www.houmatoday.com/story/news/2005/08/24/new-information-coming-soon-in-local-murders/27020266007/.Armstrong, Shell. 2007. Dominique pleads not guilty to 9 murders. January 17. Accessed March 29, 2023. https://www.houmatimes.com/news/dominique-pleads-not-guilty-to-9-murders/.Associated Press. 2005. "Man found in Lafource Parish was from Houma area." Abberville Meridional, May 3: 2.—. 2005. "Deaths od five south Lousiana men may be linked, police say." Shreveport Times, April 25: 12.—. 1999. "La. deaths may be work of serial killer." Shreveport Times, June 23: 5B.—. 2006. "Police look for links between serial suspect, priest's death." Shreveport Times, December 9: 22.—. 2006. "Arrest made in serial-killer investigation." Town Talk, December 2: 17.—. 2006. "Serial murder suspect was average Joe, says shelter residents." Town Talk, December 3: 8.DeSantis, John. 2006. Accused lived on the fringe of two worlds. December 4. Accessed March 26, 2023. https://web.archive.org/web/20210128012212/https://www.houmatoday.com/article/DA/20061204/News/608089983/HC.Hunter, Michelle. 2006. "Serial-killer suspect confesses; Trysts led to rapes, strangling, cops told." Times-Picatune, December 6.L'observateur. 1999. Beaten teen’s body discovered in Kenner. October 26. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://www.lobservateur.com/1998/10/26/beaten-teens-body-discovered-in-kenner/.—. 1999. Two deaths reclassified as murders in St. Charles Parish. Fdebruary 6. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://www.lobservateur.com/1999/02/06/two-deaths-reclassified-as-murders-in-st-charles-parish/.Morris, Robert. 2006. Mother protests dead son’s link to serial killer. June 19. Accessed March 26, 2023. https://web.archive.org/web/20210131004921/https://www.houmatoday.com/article/DA/20060619/News/608089995/HC.Ramage, James. 2005. "Serial killer theory floats around cases." Shreveport Times, May 15: 1.Rosen, Fred. 2017. The Bayou Strangler. New York, NY: Open Road Media.—. 2018. Uncovering the Truth Behind One of the Bayou Strangler’s Victims. April 10. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://the-line-up.com/uncovering-the-truth-behind-one-of-the-bayou-stranglers-victims.St. Charles Heral-Guide. 2006. Mother’s tears for son killed by serial madman Dominique. 12 06. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://www.heraldguide.com/tragedy/mothers-tears-for-son-killed-by-serial-madman-dominique/.The Daily Review. 2002. "Houma man's body found." Daily Review, October 17: 6.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 19 February 2024

Episode 538: Ronald Dominique: The Bayou Strangler (Part 2)

(Part 2) In the spring of 2005, law enforcement officials in southern Louisiana had a growing number of murder victims they had begun to suspect were connected to an unidentified serial killer operating in the area. The victims were all men, mostly in their twenties and thirties, many had histories of drug and alcohol abuse or were known to police as sex-workers, and all had been strangled and dumped in secondary locations. Over the course of a decade, Ronald Dominique developed into one of the worst and most prolific serial killers in American history; yet his story and those of his victims remains largely unknown and ignored by the mainstream media.  Thank you to the Incredible Dave White of Bring Me the Axe & 99 Cent Renal Podcasts for research! ReferencesAlford, Jeremy. 2005. New information coming soon in local murders. August 24. Accessed March 29, 2023. https://www.houmatoday.com/story/news/2005/08/24/new-information-coming-soon-in-local-murders/27020266007/.Armstrong, Shell. 2007. Dominique pleads not guilty to 9 murders. January 17. Accessed March 29, 2023. https://www.houmatimes.com/news/dominique-pleads-not-guilty-to-9-murders/.Associated Press. 2005. "Man found in Lafource Parish was from Houma area." Abberville Meridional, May 3: 2.—. 2005. "Deaths od five south Lousiana men may be linked, police say." Shreveport Times, April 25: 12.—. 1999. "La. deaths may be work of serial killer." Shreveport Times, June 23: 5B.—. 2006. "Police look for links between serial suspect, priest's death." Shreveport Times, December 9: 22.—. 2006. "Arrest made in serial-killer investigation." Town Talk, December 2: 17.—. 2006. "Serial murder suspect was average Joe, says shelter residents." Town Talk, December 3: 8.DeSantis, John. 2006. Accused lived on the fringe of two worlds. December 4. Accessed March 26, 2023. https://web.archive.org/web/20210128012212/https://www.houmatoday.com/article/DA/20061204/News/608089983/HC.Hunter, Michelle. 2006. "Serial-killer suspect confesses; Trysts led to rapes, strangling, cops told." Times-Picatune, December 6.L'observateur. 1999. Beaten teen’s body discovered in Kenner. October 26. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://www.lobservateur.com/1998/10/26/beaten-teens-body-discovered-in-kenner/.—. 1999. Two deaths reclassified as murders in St. Charles Parish. Fdebruary 6. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://www.lobservateur.com/1999/02/06/two-deaths-reclassified-as-murders-in-st-charles-parish/.Morris, Robert. 2006. Mother protests dead son’s link to serial killer. June 19. Accessed March 26, 2023. https://web.archive.org/web/20210131004921/https://www.houmatoday.com/article/DA/20060619/News/608089995/HC.Ramage, James. 2005. "Serial killer theory floats around cases." Shreveport Times, May 15: 1.Rosen, Fred. 2017. The Bayou Strangler. New York, NY: Open Road Media.—. 2018. Uncovering the Truth Behind One of the Bayou Strangler’s Victims. April 10. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://the-line-up.com/uncovering-the-truth-behind-one-of-the-bayou-stranglers-victims.St. Charles Heral-Guide. 2006. Mother’s tears for son killed by serial madman Dominique. 12 06. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://www.heraldguide.com/tragedy/mothers-tears-for-son-killed-by-serial-madman-dominique/.The Daily Review. 2002. "Houma man's body found." Daily Review, October 17: 6.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 15 February 2024

Episode 537: Ronald Dominique: The Bayou Strangler (Part 1)

In the spring of 2005, law enforcement officials in southern Louisiana had a growing number of murder victims they had begun to suspect were connected to an unidentified serial killer operating in the area. The victims were all men, mostly in their twenties and thirties, many had histories of drug and alcohol abuse or were known to police as sex-workers, and all had been strangled and dumped in secondary locations. Over the course of a decade, Ronald Dominique developed into one of the worst and most prolific serial killers in American history; yet his story and those of his victims remains largely unknown and ignored by the mainstream media.  Thank you to the Incredible Dave White of Bring Me the Axe & 99 Cent Renal Podcasts for research! ReferencesAlford, Jeremy. 2005. New information coming soon in local murders. August 24. Accessed March 29, 2023. https://www.houmatoday.com/story/news/2005/08/24/new-information-coming-soon-in-local-murders/27020266007/.Armstrong, Shell. 2007. Dominique pleads not guilty to 9 murders. January 17. Accessed March 29, 2023. https://www.houmatimes.com/news/dominique-pleads-not-guilty-to-9-murders/.Associated Press. 2005. "Man found in Lafource Parish was from Houma area." Abberville Meridional, May 3: 2.—. 2005. "Deaths od five south Lousiana men may be linked, police say." Shreveport Times, April 25: 12.—. 1999. "La. deaths may be work of serial killer." Shreveport Times, June 23: 5B.—. 2006. "Police look for links between serial suspect, priest's death." Shreveport Times, December 9: 22.—. 2006. "Arrest made in serial-killer investigation." Town Talk, December 2: 17.—. 2006. "Serial murder suspect was average Joe, says shelter residents." Town Talk, December 3: 8.DeSantis, John. 2006. Accused lived on the fringe of two worlds. December 4. Accessed March 26, 2023. https://web.archive.org/web/20210128012212/https://www.houmatoday.com/article/DA/20061204/News/608089983/HC.Hunter, Michelle. 2006. "Serial-killer suspect confesses; Trysts led to rapes, strangling, cops told." Times-Picatune, December 6.L'observateur. 1999. Beaten teen’s body discovered in Kenner. October 26. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://www.lobservateur.com/1998/10/26/beaten-teens-body-discovered-in-kenner/.—. 1999. Two deaths reclassified as murders in St. Charles Parish. Fdebruary 6. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://www.lobservateur.com/1999/02/06/two-deaths-reclassified-as-murders-in-st-charles-parish/.Morris, Robert. 2006. Mother protests dead son’s link to serial killer. June 19. Accessed March 26, 2023. https://web.archive.org/web/20210131004921/https://www.houmatoday.com/article/DA/20060619/News/608089995/HC.Ramage, James. 2005. "Serial killer theory floats around cases." Shreveport Times, May 15: 1.Rosen, Fred. 2017. The Bayou Strangler. New York, NY: Open Road Media.—. 2018. Uncovering the Truth Behind One of the Bayou Strangler’s Victims. April 10. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://the-line-up.com/uncovering-the-truth-behind-one-of-the-bayou-stranglers-victims.St. Charles Heral-Guide. 2006. Mother’s tears for son killed by serial madman Dominique. 12 06. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://www.heraldguide.com/tragedy/mothers-tears-for-son-killed-by-serial-madman-dominique/.The Daily Review. 2002. "Houma man's body found." Daily Review, October 17: 6.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 12 February 2024

Episode 536: The Murder of Gary Triano

On the evening of November 1, 1996, Tucson, Arizona real estate developer and businessman Gary Triano got into his car at the La Paloma Country Club intending to head home, where friends and family were waiting for Gary’s surprise birthday party. However, before Gary had even put the key in the ignition, the car exploded in a ball of flame, plunging the club into panic and chaos, and killing Gary instantly. To investigators, the car bomb planted under Gary’s car had all the hallmarks of a professional hit, and with Gary’s business dealings and financial troubles, there were at least a few people who would have benefitted from his death. However, within just a few weeks, suspicion fell to Triano’s ex-wife, Pamela, who’d taken out a life insurance policy on Gary during their marriage that would eventually pay out $2 million dollars.Despite being confident that Pamela was involved in Gary’s death, the year-long investigation failed to turn up any conclusive evidence tying her to the murder. Undeterred, investigators continued to pursue the case across the country and eventually around the world and in 2009, more than a decade after his death, the people responsible for Gary Triano’s death were finally arrested, but many years would pass before anyone was held accountable.Thank you to David White, of the Bring Me the Axe Podcast for research! ReferencesBodfield, Rhonda. 1996. "Broke Triano kept optimistic ." Tucson Citizen, November 9: 1.—. 1996. "Triano threats srcutinized." Tucson Citizen, November 5: 2.CBS News. 2017. "The Hit in Arizona [transcript]." CBS News, July 11.Huicochea, Alexis, and Enric Volante. 2006. "'96 bomb slaying is getting a new look." Arizona Daily Star, September 7.Innes, Stephanie. 1996. "Gambling link eyed in Triano murder." Tucson Citizen, November 4: 1.Limberis, Chris. 2001. "Requiem for a heavyweight ." Tucson Weekly, November 1.McNamara, Patrick. 2014. "Conflictring pictures painted of Triano murder suspect." Arizona Daily Star, February 20: A2.—. 2014. "Ex-wife going on trial 17 years after bomb death." Arizona Daily Star, February 16: C1.—. 2014. "Phillips gets life for fatal bombing." Arizona Daily Star, May 23: 1.Miami Herald. 2005. "A TV 'Most Wanted' fugitive is captured." Miami Herald, November 22: 138.Pence, Angela, John Rawlinson, and Alexa Haussler. 1996. "Black powder pipe bomb killed Triano." Arizona Daily Star, November 7.Sate of Arizona v. Pamela Anne Phillips. 2018. 1 CA-CR 17-0285 (Arizona Court of Appeals, July 10).Smith, Kim. 2011. "Additional mental exams for murder suspect denied." Arizona Daily Star, March 8: A2.—. 2010. "Life, no parole for killer in Triano case." Arizona Daily Star, May 4: A2.—. 2010. "Triano case closing arguments." Arizona Daily Star, March 27: A2.State of Arizona v. Ronald Kelly Young. 2012. CR20084012 (Court of Appeals State of Arizona , February 29).Teibel, David. 1996. "Blast fragments studied ." Tucson Citizen, November 1: 1.Tucson Citizen. 1973. "Realtor seeks seat on council." Tucson Citizen, June 15: 4.Volante, Enric. 2006. "Detective: Secret recordings link Triano ex, suspected death plot." Arizona Daily Star, September 8.—. 1997. "Triano assassination task force disbanded." Arizona Daily Star, August 2.Wagner, Dennis. 1996. "Bombing death puzzles police." Arizona Republic, November 10: 33.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 8 February 2024

Episode 535: Florence Burns and the Murder of Walter Brooks

When twenty-year-old Walter Brooks was found dead from a bullet to the head on Valentine’s Day 1902, suspicion immediately fell on Brooks’ nineteen-year-old sometimes-girlfriend, Florence Burns. The two were known to have a tumultuous relationship and had fought violently on the morning of his death, and there was considerable evidence indicating that Burns had been in the hotel room at the time of Brooks’ murder. However, despite all the evidence indicating guilt, Florence Burns was never brought to trial for Brooks’ murder or even formally charged with a crime, and Walter Brooks murder officially remains an unsolved case in New York. While the story of Walter Brooks and Florence Burns is relatively uncomplicated in terms of the crime around which the story is built, the story is a remarkable illustration of the ways in which things like class, gender, and technological advances can influence and even shape how the law is applied in the United States. Indeed, at the time of the murder, the nation was undergoing incredibly social and cultural changes as a result of dramatically expanded transportation and communication technology, giving rise to a youth culture the likes of which had never been seen in the nation prior. That youth culture and the rebelliousness it produced in many young wealthy Americans played a direct role, not only in Walter’s life and death, but also in the socio-cultural perspectives and Victorian beliefs that allowed Florence to get away with murder. Thank you to the wondrous Dave White of Bring me the Axe Podcast & 99 Cent Rental for Research! ReferencesEvening World. 1902. "Denised she shot broker in hotel." Evening World, February 15: 1.Ferranti, Seth. 2019. The Affluenza Murder Case That Shocked America 100 Years Ago. March 15. Accessed December 11, 2023. https://www.vice.com/en/article/d3meyv/the-affluenza-murder-case-that-shocked-america-100-years-ago.McConnell, Virginia A. 2019. The Belle of Bedford Avenue: The Sensational Brooks-Burns Murder in Turn-of-the-Century New York. Kent, OH: The Kent State University Press.New York Times. 1902. "Brooks murder case ends." New York Times, May 21: 5.—. 1903. "Florence Burns on the stage." New York Times, February 15: 10.—. 1902. "Jerome on Burns case." New York Times, March 25: 7.—. 1902. "Man shot, girl arrested ." New York Times, February 16: 3.New York Tribune. 1910. "Florence Burns again in hands of police." New York Tribune, September 21: 1.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 5 February 2024

Episode 534: The Story of Laurie Bembenek and the Tragic Murder of Christine Schultz (With Special Guest Holly Madison)

Holly Madison joins us to give us a sneak peak at one of the cases they are covering on Season Two of the Playboy Murders. We talk about the tragic murder of Christine Schultz and the trial, conviction, and escape of Laurie Bembenek. It's a tragic story that is light on justice for anyone! She also chats with us about the second season overall of the Playboy Murders which premiers on January 22nd! You can find it on Investigation ID and stream it on MAX!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 1 February 2024

Episode 533: The Mysterious Death of Charles Morgan

In March 1977, Arizona businessman Charles Morgan went missing from his home in Tucson, only to turn up three days later in the middle of the night, shoeless, traumatized, and with broken plastic handcuffs on his wrists and ankles. Unable to speak, Charles wrote that he had been drugged by an unnamed individual and kidnapped, but he refused to let his wife call the police or otherwise report the assault. Three months later, Charles Morgan’s body was discovered in the desert with a gunshot wound in the back of his head, one of his teeth wrapped in a handkerchief, and a two-dollar bill pinned to his underwear.From the outside, Charles Morgan appeared to live a very normal and decidedly unexciting life. Yet when investigators began digging into his background to find out who would have wanted him dead, they discovered a complicated and bizarre story of supposed government agents, mobsters, and a mystery that one would have expected from a Hollywood screenplay, not the life of a middle-aged Arizona escrow agent. The increasingly bizarre details of Morgan’s life and death comprise a fascinating mystery that remains unsolved to this day and endures as one of Arizona’s most baffling cold cases. Thank you to David White, of the Bring Me the Axe podcast, for research assistance ReferencesBassett, Edward, and David Dykes. 1977. "Mystery death a suicide?" Tucson Citizen, June 22: 1.Bassett, Edward, and Richard Wood. 1977. "Slain businessman's bank dealings probed." Tucson Citizen, June 27: 3.Flanagan, Ray. n.d. "Did 'hit-man."—. 1990. "Did 'hit-man' with ties to region figure in Arizona death case?" Tribune, September 25: 3.Heltsley, Ernie, and John Rawlinson. 1979. "1977 shooting ended Tucsonan's two lives." Arizona Daily Star, February 4: 1.Jordan, Tracy. 1990. "City residents asked to drop a dime on hit man." Times Leader, October 22: 3.Kwok, Abraham. 1992. "Phoenix death a mistaken 'hit'?" Arizona Republic, May 6: 10.Matas, Kimberly. 2010. "Strange evidence found in '77 on, near man's body." Arizona Daily Star, March 31: A08.1990. Unsolved Mysteries. Directed by John McLaughlin. Performed by John McLaughlin.Salkowski, Joe, and Enric Volante. 2002. "Mob faded locally long before key figure died." Arizona Daily Star, May 19: 1.Svejcara, Bob. 1977. "Sheriff finds no foul play in Morgan death." Arizona Daily Star, August 11: 13.Svejcara, Bob, and Ernie Heltsley. 1977. "Slain businessman seen during 'absence'." Arizona Daily Star, June 23: 1.Tucson Citizen. 1977. "Sheriff's probe says Morgan was a sucide." Tucson Citizen, August 11: 4.Wood, Richard. 1977. "Slain Tucson executive: solid citizen... mystery man." Tucson Citizen, June 21: 2.—. 1977. "Woman says Morgan hid, trying to buy off his life." Tucson Citizen, June 21: 1. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 29 January 2024

Episode 532: Listener Tales 82

We're closing out the month of January, and you know what THAT means- Listener Tales! It’s brought to you by you, for you, from you, and ALL ABOUT YOU! In this installment we have tales THE NINETIES! We have camping stories, late night visits from a Jesus imposter, a creepy bathroom poltergeist, and an entire community is treated to a UFO lightshow! If you’ve got a listener tale please send it on over to [email protected] with “Listener Tales” somewhere in the subject line :)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 25 January 2024

Listen Now: Dr. Death: Bad Magic

When a charismatic young doctor announces revolutionary treatments for cancer and HIV, patients from around the world turn to him for their last chance. As medical experts praise Serhat Gumrukcu’s genius, the company he co-founded rockets in value to over half a billion dollars. But when a team of researchers makes a startling discovery, they begin to suspect the brilliant doctor is hiding a secret. From Wondery, the new season of Dr. Death: Bad Magic is a story of miraculous cures, magic and murder. Hosted by Laura Beil. Listen to Dr. Death - Bad Magic: Wondery.fm/Dr.DeathSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 23 January 2024

Episode 531: Tom Bird and Lorna Anderson Eldridge

When Sandy Bird was found dead in her wrecked car in the Cottonwood River in the summer of 1983, everyone assumed the thirty-three-year-old Kansas mother of three had misjudged the turn on the one-lane bridge and gone over the side, her death a tragic accident. Similarly, when Martin Anderson was gunned down on the side of a Kansas state road just a few months later, the residents of Emporia, KS believed he was the victim of robbery gone wrong—the kind of random violence that investigators often struggled to solve. What no one knew at the time was that the ostensibly accidental death of Sandy Bird and the tragic murder of Martin Anderson were in fact linked by a conspiracy of Sandra’s husband, Tom Bird, and his mistress, Lorna Anderson, designed to rid themselves of their respective spouses. Unfortunately, their plot began unraveling just a few weeks after Martin’s murder and both Tom and Lorna were arrested for the murders, along with their co-conspirators, and eventually went to trial. While the murders shocked the communities in rural Kansas, the most unbelievable aspect of the case was that the killers were a Lutheran pastor and his devout secretary.Thank you to the wonderful, David White of the Bring Me the Axe podcast, for research assistance!ReferencesClose, Dan. 1984. "Minister is accused of soliciting murder." Wichita Eagle-Beacon, March 22: 1.—. 1984. "Minister ordered to stand trial." Wichita Eagle-Beacon, June 1: 1.—. 1983. "Slaying victim's wife held." Wichita Eagle-Beacon, November 24: 1.—. 1983. "Unanswered questions plague K-177 tragedy." Wichita Eagle-Beacon, November 8: 1.Hayes, Jean. 1985. "Jury in bird trial begins deliberations." Wichita Eagle, July 23: 51.Hays, Jean. 1985. "Bird's wife described as unhappy." Wichita Eagle, July 12: 15.Kraft, Scott. 1986. "‘We Don’t Have These Type of People Out Here’ : Murderous Affair Shocks Kansas Town." Los Angeles Times, March 17.—. 2004. "Who Killed Sandy?" Los Angeles Times Magazine, May 2.State of Kansas v. Thomas Bird. 1986. 240 Kan. 288 (Supreme Court of Kansas, December 5).State of Kansas v. Thomas P. Bird. 1985. 708 P.2d 946 (Supreme Court of Kansas, October 25).United Press International. 1985. "At first no one paid uch attention ." United Press International: Domestic News, August 4.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 22 January 2024

Episode 530: Preston Castle and the Murder of Anna Corbin

When it opened in 1894, the Preston School of Industry represented a change in how criminal offenders and wards of the state were treated in American society, shifting towards a more compassionate mission of reform over punishment. However, while the mission may have represented a more progressive approach to reforming young offenders, daily life for the young inmates was often as brutal as it would have been in an adult prison.  Thank you to the incredible Dave White of Bring Me The Ax Podcast and 99 Cent Rental for Research! ReferencesCalifornia Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. 2022. Cemetery Tales Preston holds remains of 18. October 24. Accessed December 22, 2023. https://www.cdcr.ca.gov/insidecdcr/2022/10/24/tales-from-the-cemetery-preston-holds-remains-of-18/.Daily News. 1950. "Boys' school housekeeper murdered." Daily News, February 23: 1.D'Souza, Karen. 2015. "Castle of shivers." Oakland Tribune, September 13: 67.Grandbois, Ruth. 1950. "Housekeep at Preston School found murdered." Stockton Daily Evening Record, February 24: 1.—. 1950. "Slaying victim 'like mother' to youths." Stockton Daily Evening Record, February 24: 1.Long Beach Press-Telegram. 1950. "3 Ione School Inmates held after slaying ." Long Beach Press-Telegram, February 24: 1.Lowery, James F. 1950. "Stained clothes of Ione suspect get blood test." Sacramento Bee, February 25: 1.McClatchy Newspaper Service. 1950. "What kind of woman was slain Anna Corbin of Preston?" Sacramento Bee, February 27: 1.McClatchy Newspapers Service. 1950. "Witness bares motive behind Preston killing." McClatchy Newspapers Service, June 15: 1.—. 1950. "Inmate tells court he saw Preston killing." Sacramento Bee, March 10: 1.McClatchy Newspapes Service. 1950. "Employees are cleared in Preston killing." Sacramento Bee, February 28: 1.McManis, Sam. 2015. Discoveries: Ione’s Preston Castle opens up about its harsh, haunting past. June 28. Accessed December 21, 2023. https://www.sacbee.com/entertainment/living/travel/sam-mcmanis/article25499146.html.Sacramento Bee. 1950. "Chief Preston killing witness changes story." Sacramento Bee, April 6: 41.—. 1950. "Murder trial of Eugene Monroe is nearing close." Sacramento Bee, April 28: 1.—. 1950. "Preston suspect was grilled in 1947 LA murder." Sacramento Bee, March 6: 1.—. 1950. "Prosecutor plans parade of witnesses in Monroe trial." Sacramento Bee, April 26: 10.—. 1950. "Youth Authority decides to free Preston inmate." Sacramento Bee, October 20: 1.Sacramento Union. 1951. "Eugene Monroe, Preston parole, confesses sex-murder in Tulsa." Sacramento Union, July 28: 1.Sacremento Daily Record-Union. 1889. "The reform school." Sacremento Daily Record-Union, February 16: 8.San Francisco Examiner. 1894. "Preston School of Industry." San Francisco Examiner, August 6: 3.Valley News Service. 1950. "State planning to reopen case against Monroe." Sacramento Union, April 30: 1.Wilson, Stanley. 1950. "LA inmate is chief suspect in Ione killing." Sacramento Bee, March 1: 1. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 18 January 2024

Episode 529: Ann & Billy Woodward

In the early morning hours of October 31, 1955, millionaire socialite Ann Woodward heard a strange noise in the hallway just beyond her bedroom door in the sprawling estate she shared with her husband, Billy, and their two children. There had been a series of robberies in the wealthy neighborhood that month, so Ann had kept a shotgun next to her bed for safety. Rising from her bed, Ann grabbed the gun and crept towards the door, slowly opening it so as not to attract any attention. Visibility was low in the darkened hallway, but she could see the vague shape of a man moving towards her and without hesitation, Ann raised the shotgun and fired in the direction, striking the figure and cutting him down. With the threat neautralized, Ann moved towards the figure on the floor only to realize she’d shot and killed her husband, Billy Woodward. At least that’s the official version of the story. The investigation moved incredibly quickly, in the way it always seems to for the wealthiest among us, and Ann Woodward was cleared of any wrongdoing in the death of her husband—it was simply an accident. Yet there were many among Ann and Billy’s family and friends who believed Ann had intentionally shot her husband that night in order to prevent him from going forward with a messy divorce that would have brought an end to the glamorous high society lifestyle she spent her entire life working to secure.Ann Woodward was never able to escape the rumors and gossip from those she’d once counted as friends, all of which was made exponentially worse by novelist Truman Capote, whose slanderous fiction many believe drove Ann to suicide. Ann’s untimely death meant that many questions would forever go unanswered: did she really kill her husband in order to remain among America’s elite moneymakers? Thank you to the amazing Dave White of Bring Me the Ax Podcast for research! ReferencesAssociated Press. 1955. "Mrs. Woodward stays in hospital; to miss husband's funeral." Buffalo Evening News, November 1: 10.—. 1955. "Mrs. Woodward's father dumbfounded." Buffalo Evening News, November 1: 10.—. 1956. "Woodward case burgler sentenced ." Los Angeles Times, February 5: 6.Bigart, Homer. 1955. "Woodward left trusts to 2 sons." New York Times, November 10: 36.Bracker, Milton. 1955. "Wife kills Woodward, owner of Nashua." New York Times, October 31: 1.—. 1955. "Woodward jury finds no crime after widow testifies in shooting." New York Times, November 26: 1.—. 1955. "Woodward proweler now admits being on estate at time of killing." New York Times, November 8: 1.Braudy, Susan. 1992. This Crazy Thing Called Love. New York, NY: A.A. Knopf.Kashner, Sam. 2012. "Capote's Swan Dive." Vanity Fair, November 15.Knickerbocker, Cholly. 1955. "Violent scenes marked Woodward marriage." San Francisco Examiner, November 11: 9.Montillo, Roseanne. 2022. Deliberate Cruelty: Truman Capote, the Millionaire's Wife, and the Murder of the Century. New York, NY: Atria Books.New York Times. 1955. "Prowler dsicusses Woodward case aid." New York Times, November 9: 36.Randolph, Nancy. 1955. "N.Y. society shocked by shooting." Los Angeles Times, March 30: 7.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 15 January 2024

Episode 528: The Murders of Stan Farr and Andrea Wilborn

When Priscilla Davis filed for divorce from her husband, Cullen Davis, in 1974, she had no idea that her actions would have such tragic consequences. Less than two years later, on the same day the divorce was finalized and the terms of the alimony were settled, a man wearing a disguise broke into Priscilla’s home and killed her twelve-year-old daughter, then waited for Priscilla to return. When she arrived a short time later, the intruder said hello to Priscilla and her new boyfriend before shooting them both, wounding Priscilla and killing her companion.Cullen Davis was immediately suspected of the murders and taken into custody, leading to one of the most sensational and captivating trials the country had ever seen. The wealthiest man to ever be tried for murder in the United States up to that point, Cullen Davis was said to be the primary influence for the villainous J.R. Ewing, the main antagonist on the hit television series Dallas, and he more than lived up to the role. Davis’s wealth and status allowed him to control the narrative of the trial, which quickly became an indictment of his former wife, who, despite being the victim of a horrible crime, was vilified by the press and the defense as the real villain in the case.Although it is nearly five decades in the past, the marriage of Priscilla and Cullen Davis, and the murder trial that followed, are emblematic of many of the issues that the American justice system (and the public) continues to struggle with today including who is and isn’t a victim, and how power and money can control the pursuit and application of justice.Thank you to David White, of the Bring Me the Axe podcast, for research assistanceReferencesBrown, Greg. 2016. Texas Tragedy: The Story of Priscilla Davis: A True Story of Money, Murder and Survival. Dallas, TX: CreateSpace.Cartwright, Gary. 1977. "Rich Man, Dead Man." Texas Monthly, March 1.Cochran, Mike. 1977. "Davis trial: Haynes says Farr target of shooting." Denton Record-Chronicle, October 25: 5.Fort Worth Star-Telegram. 1977. "DA's narration to Davis jury detailed but brief." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, August 21: 2.—. 1976. "Judge defends bond on Davis." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, August 4: 1.Guzzo, Glenn. 1977. "Davis cries tears of joy after acquittal." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, November 18: 1.—. 1977. "Davis' fate now in jurors' hands." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, November 17: 1.—. 1977. "Final arguments begin." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, November 16: 1.—. 1977. "His innocence avowed, Davis doubts provocation." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, July 7: 1.—. 1977. "Questioning nets no jurors." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, March 1: 1.Hollandsworth, Skip. 2001. "Survivor's gilt: convinced that it was her husband who tried to kill her, the Texas socialite devoted herself to the best revenge." New York Times Magazine, December 30.—. 2000. "Blood Will Sell." Texas Monthly, March 1.McConal, Jon, and Mark Nelson. 1977. "Few surprised by Davis verdict." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, November 18: 1.Moore, Dick. 1976. "Slain man was liked by fans, teammates." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, August 3: 1.Moore, Evan. 1976. "Davis jailed without bond." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, August 20: 1.—. 1977. "Picture of Priscilla, Rufner not allowed as evidence by judge." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, August 24: 1.Stiteler, Rowland. 1976. "Blood-spattered white foyer tells story of slayings." Fort Worth Star-Telegram , August 3: 6.—. 1976. "Davis jailed after slayings." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, August 3: 1.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 11 January 2024

Episode 527: The Murder of Mary Stannard

On the afternoon of September 3, 1878, twenty-two-year-old Mary Stannard d left her home in Madison, Connecticut, telling her father she was going blackberry picking and would be back before dark. When night came and Mary hadn’t returned, her father went out to look for her and eventually found her body by a creek in the woods. The investigation into her murder was truly wild and remains TECHNICALLY unsolved. Thank you to the amazing Dave White of Bring Me The Axe Podcast for research! ReferencesBendici, Ray. 2015. "The CT files: the 'unsolved murder of Mary STAN-ard." Cennecticut Magazine, August 23.Foote, William. 1970. "Mary STAN-ard, she was murdered." Hartford Courant, March 5: 16.Hartford Courant. 1878. "Hayden re-arrested." Hartford Courant, October 9: 3.—. 1878. "Strong circumstantial evidence against a clergyman." Hartford Courant, September 7: 2.—. 1878. "The Madison murder." Hartford Courant, September 6: 3.Hayden, Herbert. 1880. The Reverend Herbert Hayden: An Autobiography. Hartford, CT: Press of the Plimptron Manufacturing Co.New York Times. 1878. "A young woman's ruin and death." New York Times, September 6: 1.—. 1878. "Is Rev. Mr. Hayden guilty." New York Times, September 14: 5.—. 1879. "Mary STAN-ard's death." New York Times, November 7: 5.—. 1878. "Mrs. Hayden's testimony." New York Times, September 21: 1.—. 1880. "The Hayden case: beginning of the closing arguments." New York Times, January 15: 5.—. 1879. "The long murder trial." New York Times, November 21: 2.Pearson, Edmund. 1927. "Mary STAN-ard and the Reverend Mr. Hayden." Vanity Fair, March 01.Unknown author. 1879. Poor Mary STAN-ard: A Full and Thrilling Story of the Circumstances Connected with Her Murder. New Haven: Stafford Printing Company.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 8 January 2024

Episode 526: The Death of Joan Robinson Hill- Part 2

Part 2/2 - On March 19, 1969, thirty-eight-year-old Houston socialite Joan Robinson Hill died at Sharpstown General Hospital from what doctors at the time believed was flu-related symptoms. Hill’s body was quickly taken to the mortuary and embalmed before an autopsy could be performed, violating Texas law and undermining any attempts determine the cause of Joan’s death. Nevertheless, Joan’s father, a wealthy oil tycoon, believed his daughter’s death to be a homicide, used his influence to have her remains exhumed and had not one, but two additional autopsies performed to determine the cause of death. Despite conflicting reports from the pathologists regarding a cause of death, Joan’s father was eventually successful in convincing the district attorney that her death was no accident, but was in fact murder committed by her husband, John Hill. After two unsuccessful attempts to convince a grand jury of John’s guilt, the district attorney finally convinced a third grand jury that John Hill had intentionally contributed to Joan’s death and he was charged with “murder by omission,” a first in the history of the Texas courts.John Hill was put on trial for the murder of his wife in the winter of 1971, but the jury would never get a chance to weigh in on his guilt or innocence. In September of 1972, after one mistrial and several delays leading up to a re-trial, John Hill was murdered by an intruder who’d broken into his home. Although investigators believed Hill’s murder to have been a robbery gone wrong, many in Houston suspected Joan’s father, believing his son-in-law had evaded justice, had paid to have John Hill killed, leaving the deaths of Joan and John Hill an enduring mystery. As always, thank you to the fantastic David White, of Bring Me the Axe Podcast, for research assistance ReferencesAssociated Press. 1971. "Doctor 'hated' first wife." Corpus Christi Times, February 26: 1.—. 1972. "Houston doctor slain at home." Corpus Christi Times, September 25: 13.—. 1969. "Meningitis said fatal to socialite ." Corpus Christi Times, October 11: 13.—. 1971. "Judge calls mistrial in Houston slaying." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, February 27: 12.—. 1970. "Panel indicts doctor in death of wife." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, May 23: 3.—. 1973. "District judge clamps lid on Houston doctor's murder." Odessa American, April 27: 3.—. 1971. "Testimony continues in trial of physician." Odessa American, February 23: 2.Gonzalez, J.R. 2009. 40 years later: Joan Robinson Hill. March 19. Accessed November 7, 2023. https://blog.chron.com/bayoucityhistory/2009/03/40-years-later-joan-robinson-hill/.New York Times. 1977. "Oilman is cleared in Houston murder of his son-in-law." New YorkTimes, October 22: 1.Thompson, Thomas. 1976. Blood and Money: A True Story of Murder, Passion, and Power. New York, NY: Doubleday.United Press International. 1980. "Heiress may have been toxic shock victim." United Press International, November 23.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 4 January 2024

Episode 525: The Death of Joan Robinson Hill- Part 1

On March 19, 1969, thirty-eight-year-old Houston socialite Joan Robinson Hill died at Sharpstown General Hospital from what doctors at the time believed was flu-related symptoms. Hill’s body was quickly taken to the mortuary and embalmed before an autopsy could be performed, violating Texas law and undermining any attempts determine the cause of Joan’s death. Nevertheless, Joan’s father, a wealthy oil tycoon, believed his daughter’s death to be a homicide, used his influence to have her remains exhumed and had not one, but two additional autopsies performed to determine the cause of death. Despite conflicting reports from the pathologists regarding a cause of death, Joan’s father was eventually successful in convincing the district attorney that her death was no accident, but was in fact murder committed by her husband, John Hill. After two unsuccessful attempts to convince a grand jury of John’s guilt, the district attorney finally convinced a third grand jury that John Hill had intentionally contributed to Joan’s death and he was charged with “murder by omission,” a first in the history of the Texas courts.John Hill was put on trial for the murder of his wife in the winter of 1971, but the jury would never get a chance to weigh in on his guilt or innocence. In September of 1972, after one mistrial and several delays leading up to a re-trial, John Hill was murdered by an intruder who’d broken into his home. Although investigators believed Hill’s murder to have been a robbery gone wrong, many in Houston suspected Joan’s father, believing his son-in-law had evaded justice, had paid to have John Hill killed, leaving the deaths of Joan and John Hill an enduring mystery. As always, thank you to the fantastic David White, of Bring Me the Axe Podcast, for research assistance ReferencesAssociated Press. 1971. "Doctor 'hated' first wife." Corpus Christi Times, February 26: 1.—. 1972. "Houston doctor slain at home." Corpus Christi Times, September 25: 13.—. 1969. "Meningitis said fatal to socialite ." Corpus Christi Times, October 11: 13.—. 1971. "Judge calls mistrial in Houston slaying." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, February 27: 12.—. 1970. "Panel indicts doctor in death of wife." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, May 23: 3.—. 1973. "District judge clamps lid on Houston doctor's murder." Odessa American, April 27: 3.—. 1971. "Testimony continues in trial of physician." Odessa American, February 23: 2.Gonzalez, J.R. 2009. 40 years later: Joan Robinson Hill. March 19. Accessed November 7, 2023. https://blog.chron.com/bayoucityhistory/2009/03/40-years-later-joan-robinson-hill/.New York Times. 1977. "Oilman is cleared in Houston murder of his son-in-law." New YorkTimes, October 22: 1.Thompson, Thomas. 1976. Blood and Money: A True Story of Murder, Passion, and Power. New York, NY: Doubleday.United Press International. 1980. "Heiress may have been toxic shock victim." United Press International, November 23.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 1 January 2024

Episode 524: Listener Tales 81

It’s Listener Tales 81 and you know the drill…..! It’s brought to you by you, for you, from you, and ALL ABOUT YOU! In this installment we have haunted clown sightings, almost run ins with the most notorious serial killers, spooky choirs& creepy men abroad. If you’ve got a listener tale please send it on over to [email protected] with “Listener Tales” somewhere in the subject line :)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 28 December 2023

Episode 523: Fan Favorite - The Dark Secrets Behind the Wizard of Oz

This episode is a fan favorite that was originally published as Episode 281… For this Holiday week, we wanted to bring you a lighter (?) episode, although it’s really not so light at all! Alaina’s kids have gotten super into the Wizard of Oz and so she decided to do dive into the dark happenings during filming. All kinds of atrocities went down and we are pretty confident that you’ll never watch this movie the same! Sorry…. we mean you’re welcome! References: -https://www.amazon.com/Making-Wizard-Oz-Aljean-Harmetz/dp/1613748329/ref=sr_1_2?crid=TWGV0EMUDT2P&amp;keywords=the+making+of+the+wizard+of+oz+book&amp;qid=1637775119&amp;sprefix=the+making+of+the+wiza%2Caps%2C161&amp;sr=8-2" target="_blank" -The Making of the Wizard of Oz By Aljean Harmetz</a> (Be wary that this book is fascinating but uses some outdated language when referencing certain people)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 25 December 2023

Episode 522: The Mysterious Death of Christina Kettlewell

On May 20, 1947, decorated army veteran Jack Kettlewell and his friend Ronald Barrie barely escaped a devastating housefire at Ronald’s cabin along the Severen River in rural Ontario, Canada. One day later, Jack’s twenty-two-year-old wife, Christina Kettlewell, was discovered dead a short distance from the cabin, lying face down in a pool of shallow water and still wearing the pajamas she had on the night of the fire. During the autopsy, it was discovered that Christina’s lungs were clear of smoke and her body was free of any burns or other signs of violence; rather, as unbelievable as it seemed, the cause of death was drowning. Christina and Jack had married in a secret ceremony held just eight days before the fire, leading many to wonder whether her new husband had something to do with her death. Was it a crime of passion? A calculated murder to cash-in on a life insurance policy? Or was it truly just a tragedy? And what of Ronald Barrie’s presence on the trip? If it was indeed a honeymoon of sorts, why had the young newlyweds brought along a friend? In the months that followed, Christina Kettlewell’s mysterious death captivated the residents of eastern Canada. With each new day, a piece of the puzzle seemed to fall into place, indicating that the mystery might soon be solved. Yet by mid-summer, a police investigation and the coroner’s inquest had failed to provide an explanation for Christina’s death or a satisfactory conclusion to the case. Today, more than seventy-five years later, the death of Christina Kettlewell remains one of Ontario’s most enduring mysteries.Thank you to the wonderful David White, of the Bring Me the Axe Podcast, for research assistance! ReferencesIsai, Vjosa. 2017. What happened to Toronto's 'eight-day bride?'. July 4. Accessed November 27, 2023. https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/what-happened-to-toronto-s-eight-day-bride/article_1a09012b-13fa-5931-b512-7cc331d56ed4.html.Kingston Whig-Standard. 1947. "Coroner's jury to view place bride died." Kingston Whig-Standard, June 25: 1.North Bay Nugget. 1947. "Open verdict is returned in Kettlewell case." North Bay Nugget, June 26: 1.Owen Sound Daily Sun-Times. 1947. "Possibility of suicide in drowning of bride investigated by police." Owen Sound Daily Sun-Times, mAY 23: 1.Sun Times. 1947. "Open verdict is returned by Kettlewell case jury as no decision reached." Sun Times, June 26: 1.—. 1947. "Open verdict is returned by Kettlewell case jury as no decision reached." Sun Times, June 26: 1.Toronto Daily Star. 1947. "Police report distrubance before Christina married." Toronto Daily Star, May 28: 2.—. 1947. "Suicide notes bride's expert tells inquest." Toronto Daily Star, June 20: 1.Windsor Star. 1947. "Police hint at foul play in mystery." Windsor Star, May 22: 1.—. 1947. "Probe for missing cash in honeymoon mystery." Windsor Star, May 26: 1.—. 1947. "Statement of Ronald Barrie reveals some strange events." Windsor Star, June 21: 8. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 21 December 2023

Episode 521: Velma Barfield

On November 2, 1984, fifty-two-year-old Velma Barfield was executed by lethal injection at North Carolina’s Central Prison, bringing an end to years of legal appeals and emotional debates over the death penalty and how, when, and to whom it gets applied. For six years, Barfield had sat on death row following her conviction for the poisoning murder of her boyfriend Stewart Taylor in 1976; however, during her trial she confessed to killing at least four other people.Velma Barfield’s trial came at a time in the United States when Americans were just beginning to grapple with the concept of a serial killer, and the idea that a woman could commit such heinous acts seemed entirely inconceivable. Although woman had been sentenced to death for murder before in the US, none had confessed to methodically killing multiple people in such a callous way and for such a trivial reason. The debate only became more complicated following her death sentence, an already complicated subject among Americans that became exponentially so in 1984, when Barfield’s case and personal story became a major talking point for politicians running for office around the state.Thank you to the Incredible Dave White of Bring Me the Axe Podcast for Research!ReferencesAssociated Press. 1984. "Hunt hopes Barfield's death will be deterrent." Asheville Citizen-Times, November 3: 1.—. 1978. "Woman charged in poisoning ." Charlotte Obvserver, March 15: 1.Barfield, Velma. 1985. Woman on Death Row. Nashville, TN: Oliver-Nelson .Bledsoe, Jerry. 1998. Death Sentence: The True Story of Velma Barfield's Life, Crimes, and Punishment. Dutton: Boston, MA.Carroll, Ginny. 1978. "Confessed poisoner awaits death." News and Observer, December 10: 1.Charlotte Observer. 1984. "New Evidence: Velma Barfield's Sickness." Charlotte Observer, October 31: 12.Journal Wire. 1984. "200 gather at funeral of Velma Barfield." Winston-Salem Journal, November 4: 35.Margie Velma Barfield v. James C. Woodward, Secretary of Corrections; Nathan A. Rice,warden; Rufus Edmisten, Attorney General, Appellees. 1984. 748 F.2d 844 (US Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, November 1).Maxwell, Connie. 1984. "State executes Velma Barfield." Chapel Hill Newspaper, November 2: 1.Monk, John, Sue Anne Pressley, and Gary Wright. 1984. "Velma Barfield executed by injection." Charlotte Observer, November 2: 1.Ness and Observer. 1978. "Jailed woman eyed in more deaths." News and Observer, March 15: 1.New York Times. 1984. "Relatives of murder victims urge no clemency for Carolina killer." New York Times, September 20: B15.News and Observer. 1980. "Lawyer says he coached Mrs. Barfield." News and Observer, November 18: 17.Pearsall, Chip. 1978. "Barfield jury calls for death." News and Observer, December 3: 1.Stein, George. 1978. "Arsenic trail: Lumberton asks where it will end." Charlotte News, May 27: 1.The Robesonian. 1969. "Parkton man succumbs to smoke inhalation." The Robesonian, April 22: 1.Tilley, Greta. 1980. "She doesn't want to die." News and Record, September 21: 1.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 18 December 2023

Episode 520: Dudleytown: Connecticut’s Cursed Ghost Town

Deep in the woods near Cornwall, Connecticut, in a valley known as the Dark Entry Forest, lie the remains of the small village of Dudleytown. Settled in the mid-eighteenth century by British colonists, Dudleytown was a thriving mining community that for provided charcoal and other minerals for the growing steel industry in and around New England. But by the late nineteenth century, the mining industry had shifted west and slowly, but surely the population of Dudleytown shrank until there, by the early twentieth century, there were only a handful of people living in the village. By 1924, the village of Dudleytown was completely abandoned and fell into the ownership of a private trust, who sought to restore the forest ecosystem to its pre-colonial health. In retrospect, historians and others familiar with the region have cited a variety of social, economic, and ecological reasons for the collapse and abandonment of Dudleytown, yet there are those who believe the abandonment of the village has a darker and more supernatural explanation. There were rumors of widespread madness among the villagers, unexplained deaths and other tragedies, and a curse that dates back to the founding of village in the 1740s. Today, the area is said to be haunted and, despitebeing private property, it has become a popular destination for ghost hunters and legend trippers who are determined to find out whether Dudleytown is truly a cursed village or just a victim of shifting social and economic trends. Thank you to the incredible Dave White of Bring me the Axe Podcast for Research! ReferencesBarlow, Bart. 1980. &quot;A lost town populated by legends.&quot; New York Times, October 26: C2.Campos, Chris. 1976. &quot;The death of a town is the life of a curse.&quot; The Journal, May 29: 1.Cornwall Conservation Commission. 2012. The Land and People of Cornwall, Connecticut: A Conservation Perspective of Our Town&#39;s Natural Treasures. Historical evalutation, Cornwall, CT: Cornwall Conservation Commission.Cornwall Historical Society. 2014. The Truth about Dudleytown. September 29. Accessed October 29,2023. http://cornwallhistoricalsociety.blogspot.com/2014/09/the-truth-about-dudleytown.html.Drozdowski, Ted. 1978. &quot;Old ghouls still haunt state&#39;s cliffs, villages.&quot; The Morning Record and Journal,October 28: 35.Hartford Courant. 2006. &quot;True curse haunting family&#39;s forest land was progress.&quot; Hartford Courant,October 25: B2.Hutter, David. 2008. Man pays price to spot Dudleytown ghosts. August 3. Accessed October 3, 2023.https://www.registercitizen.com/news/article/Man-pays-price-to-spot-Dudleytown-ghosts-12147138.php.New England Historical Society. n.d. The Dudleytown Curse, Connecticut&#39;s Village of the Damned.Accessed October 3, 2023. https://newenglandhistoricalsociety.com/the-dudleytown-curse-connecticuts-village-of-the-damned/.Pallatto, John. 1980. &quot;Only the ghost hunters walk in legend-cursed Dudleytown.&quot; Hartford Courant,November 1: 9.Pettit, John. 1996. &quot;The spirits were willing, but the flesh was weak.&quot; Record Journal, October 31: 1.Revai, Cheri. 2006. Haunted Connecticut: Ghosts and Strange Phenomena of the Constitution State.Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books.Rierden, Andi. 1989. &quot;A hamlet that can&#39;t get rid of its ghosts.&quot; New York Times, October 29: C2.Ryan, Bill. 1986. &quot;Dudleytown legend haunts Cornwall.&quot; Hartford Courant, April 13: 12.Siedzik, Jason. 2011. In Cornwall, Dudleytown movie makers arrested. December 8. Accessed October 3,2023. https://www.ctinsider.com/news/article/In-Cornwall-Dudley-Town-Movie-Makers-Arrested-16886230.php.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 14 December 2023

Episode 519: Sharon Kinne- La Pistolera Pt.2

On March 19, 1960, Kansas City police were called to the home James and Sharon Kinne for what they believed was an accidental shooting. According to Sharon, she had found their two-year-old daughter lying on the couple’s bed, a gun near her hand and her father’s body next to her with a large hole in his head. Unable to find evidence to the contrary, the shooting was ruled an accident and Sharon collected on her husband’s life insurance policy. It wasn’t until a few months later, when the wife of Sharon’s new boyfriend went missing and eventually turned up dead, that investigators came to believe that James Kinne’s death was no accident.Sharon Kinne was eventually arrested and charged with the murders of her husband James and of Patricia Jones, the wife of Sharon’s boyfriend at the time of her arrest. During the course of their investigation, detectives began unraveling a lurid tale of infidelity and conspiracy that resulted in at least two murders. Ultimately, Sharon would be acquitted of her Patricia Jones’ murder, and would be tried three times for the murder of James Kinne. Before she could be tried for a fourth time, Sharon fled to Mexico with the help of yet another boyfriend, where she killed Francisco Parades Ordoñez in what she claimed was self-defense. The Mexican authorities rejected that claim and in 1964 Sharon was tried and convicted for murder, receiving a ten-year prison sentence. However, after serving just five years of her sentence, Sharon Kinne escaped the Mexican prison and has been on the run ever since. Today, more than fifty years later, she is still considered a fugitive with active warrants out for her arrest. Thank you to the wonderful David White, of the Bring Me the Axe pod, for research assistance  ReferencesDoyle, Patricia Janson. 1962. "Sharon thinks of trial, jury and jail." Kansas City Times, January 13: 1.Hays, James C. 1997. I'm Just an Ordinary Girl: The Sharon Kinne Story. Leawood, KS: Leathers Book Publishing.Kansas City Star. 1961. "Anxious in his hunt for wife." Kansas City Star, June 16: 1.—. 1961. "'Changed her story on gun'." Kansas City Star, June 15: 1.—. 1960. "Fin a woman slain in woods." Kansas City Star, May 28: 1.—. 1962. "'Fixed a price for his death'." Kansas City Star, January 9: 1.—. 1960. "Officers study life of families in slaying probe." Kansas City Star, May 28: 1.—. 1960. "Puzzled over a fatal shot." Kansas City Star, March 20: 1.—. 1960. "Rap coroner in slaying probe." Kansas City Star, June 2: 1.—. 1960. "Weird ties in murder probe." Kansas City Star, May 29: 1.Kansas City Times. 1962. "Boldizs views offer as jest." Kansas City Times, January 10: 1.—. 1969. "Kinne Search Widens." Kansas City Times, December 9: 1.—. 1962. "Mrs. Kinne found guilty." Kansas City Times, January 12: 1.—. 1961. "Sharon Kinne goes free." Kansas City Times, June 23: 1.—. 1962. "Somber Sharon Kinne starts jail routine." Kansas City Times, January 12: 1.Kelleghan, Kevin. 1969. "Sharon Kinne hunt eases up." Kansas City Times, December 18: 31.Maryville Daily Forum. 1961. "Testimony on death gun to KC jurors." Marysville Daily Forum, June 19: 1.Olwine, Margaret. 1974. "Sharon Kinne: Is she free forever, part II." Kansas City Star Magazine, February 17: 14.—. 1974. "Sharon Kinne: Is she free forever?" Kansas City Star Magazine, February 17: 17-19.Weber, David. 1964. "Sharon Kinne in jail." Kansas City Star, September 20: 1.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 11 December 2023

Episode 518: Sharon Kinne- La Pistolera Pt.1

On March 19, 1960, Kansas City police were called to the home James and Sharon Kinne for what they believed was an accidental shooting. According to Sharon, she had found their two-year-old daughter lying on the couple’s bed, a gun near her hand and her father’s body next to her with a large hole in his head. Unable to find evidence to the contrary, the shooting was ruled an accident and Sharon collected on her husband’s life insurance policy. It wasn’t until a few months later, when the wife of Sharon’s new boyfriend went missing and eventually turned up dead, that investigators came to believe that James Kinne’s death was no accident.Sharon Kinne was eventually arrested and charged with the murders of her husband James and of Patricia Jones, the wife of Sharon’s boyfriend at the time of her arrest. During the course of their investigation, detectives began unraveling a lurid tale of infidelity and conspiracy that resulted in at least two murders. Ultimately, Sharon would be acquitted of her Patricia Jones’ murder, and would be tried three times for the murder of James Kinne. Before she could be tried for a fourth time, Sharon fled to Mexico with the help of yet another boyfriend, where she killed Francisco Parades Ordoñez in what she claimed was self-defense. The Mexican authorities rejected that claim and in 1964. Sharon was tried and convicted for murder, receiving a ten-year prison sentence. However, after serving just five years of her sentence, Sharon Kinne escaped the Mexican prison and has been on the run ever since. Today, more than fifty years later, she is still considered a fugitive with active warrants out for her arrest. Thank you to the wonderful David White, of the Bring Me the Axe pod, for research assistance  ReferencesDoyle, Patricia Janson. 1962. "Sharon thinks of trial, jury and jail." Kansas City Times, January 13: 1.Hays, James C. 1997. I'm Just an Ordinary Girl: The Sharon Kinne Story. Leawood, KS: Leathers Book Publishing.Kansas City Star. 1961. "Anxious in his hunt for wife." Kansas City Star, June 16: 1.—. 1961. "'Changed her story on gun'." Kansas City Star, June 15: 1.—. 1960. "Fin a woman slain in woods." Kansas City Star, May 28: 1.—. 1962. "'Fixed a price for his death'." Kansas City Star, January 9: 1.—. 1960. "Officers study life of families in slaying probe." Kansas City Star, May 28: 1.—. 1960. "Puzzled over a fatal shot." Kansas City Star, March 20: 1.—. 1960. "Rap coroner in slaying probe." Kansas City Star, June 2: 1.—. 1960. "Weird ties in murder probe." Kansas City Star, May 29: 1.Kansas City Times. 1962. "Boldizs views offer as jest." Kansas City Times, January 10: 1.—. 1969. "Kinne Search Widens." Kansas City Times, December 9: 1.—. 1962. "Mrs. Kinne found guilty." Kansas City Times, January 12: 1.—. 1961. "Sharon Kinne goes free." Kansas City Times, June 23: 1.—. 1962. "Somber Sharon Kinne starts jail routine." Kansas City Times, January 12: 1.Kelleghan, Kevin. 1969. "Sharon Kinne hunt eases up." Kansas City Times, December 18: 31.Maryville Daily Forum. 1961. "Testimony on death gun to KC jurors." Marysville Daily Forum, June 19: 1.Olwine, Margaret. 1974. "Sharon Kinne: Is she free forever, part II." Kansas City Star Magazine, February 17: 14.—. 1974. "Sharon Kinne: Is she free forever?" Kansas City Star Magazine, February 17: 17-19.Weber, David. 1964. "Sharon Kinne in jail." Kansas City Star, September 20: 1.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 7 December 2023

Episode 517: The Black Sisters and the Murder of Ocey Snead

When East Orange, New Jersey police were called to the home of Virginia Wardlaw in late November 1909, they knew only that there had been an accident involving Virginia’s niece, Ocey Snead. Once they’d arrived, however, officers discovered Ocey’s body in an upstairs bathtub, dead from what appeared to be suicide by drowning. After just a few weeks of investigation, it became clear that Ocey’s death was no accident. Suspicion quickly fell on Virginia and her two sisters, who were soon charged with Ocey’s murder, which investigators believed was committed in order to collect on a large insurance policy. The murder of Ocey Snead was an undeniable tragedy, but her death was only the beginning of what would become one of the early twentieth century’s most captivating crime stories. As detectives and the press dug deeper into the background of the three women accused of starving and drowning their niece, a bizarre story emerged that sounded as though it had been pulled directly from the pages of a classic southern gothic horror novel. And like any good gothic horror story, the trial of Virginia Wardlaw and her sisters was full of unbelievable twists and culminated in a shocking conclusion. Thank you to the Wondrous Dave White of Bring Me the Axe Podcast for Research! ReferencesNew York Times. 1910. "Alienists declare Mrs. Martin insane." New York Times, September 21: 6.—. 1909. "Bathtub mystery no murder, she says." New York Times, December 2: 2.—. 1909. "Bathtub principals are twice indicted ." New York Times, December 23: 4.—. 1910. "Miss Wardlaw dies; starved herself." New York Times, August 12: 1.—. 1911. "Mrs. Martin pleads to manslaughter ." New York Times, January 10: 2.—. 1910. "Mrs. Martin's cries halt lunacy trial." New York Times, November 8: 7.—. 1909. "Mrs. Snead's family full of fatalities." New York Times, December 9: 20.—. 1910. "Ocey Snead was drugged ." New York Times, January 21: 1.—. 1910. "Say Miss Wardlaw is dying." New York Times, August 11: 4.—. 1909. "The Snead msytery." New York Times, December 18: 12.Rife, Luanne. 2016. "The Black Sisters." Roanoke Times, December 1: 116.Roanoke Times. 1909. "Christiansburg woman is held." Roanoke Times, December 3: 1.West, Mike. 2009. "Fearless Confederate died mysteriously in NYC." Murfreesboro Post, February 15: 8.—. 2009. "'Sisters in Black' sour Ocey's domestic bliss." Murfreesboro Post, February 22: 8.Zierold, Norman. 1968. Three Sisters in Black. New York, NY: Little, Brown.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 4 December 2023

Episode 516: Listener Tales 80

It is Listener Tales 80 and this installment is brought to you by HEROES with the spookiest of tales… A decomposing body, florescent yellow fluid, possessed toys, a baby seeing ghost, and a man in black. These are brought to you by you, for you, from you and all about you so if you have a listener tale please go ahead and send it to [email protected] with "Listener Tale" somewhere in the subject line :)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Transcribed - Published: 30 November 2023

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