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Eat Sleep Work Repeat

Bruce Daisley

Science, Social Sciences, Culture, Business, Management, Work, Workplace Culture

4.7991 Ratings

Overview

MAKE WORK BETTER. Eat Sleep Work Repeat is the best podcast about workplace culture - it's been listened to millions of times.


Bruce Daisley brings a curious mind to discussions about our jobs and the role they play in our lives.


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Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

190 Episodes

Presence: 'Yes and...' - how the secrets of improv can teach us about work

This episode is part of the Presence project: Presence: Fixing culture starts with your calendar, not your office You might think an episode about improv comedy might be a stretch for a podcast about making work better. But in fact as Kelly Leonard explains today the skills of improv comedy are the most important ones that will determine our success at work.  Kelly helps to run Second City, the world's famous famous improv comedy club - he believes that improv skills can teach us about what we need in work going forwards. ** TRIGGER WARNING ** includes one brief mention of poetry Check our Kelly's book Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 16 May 2024

Presence: Fish! Time to revisit a culture classic?

This episode is part of the Presence project: Presence: Fixing culture starts with your calendar, not your office In the 2000s a book called Fish! A remarkable way to boost morale and improve results became a bestseller. A small book, it was often used by companies accompanying a video of the same name. Together the two told a story of the culture of the fish market in Seattle, a noisy, bombastic place, but a place that was filled with joy. I first encountered Fish when a firm came to pitch to me when I was working in publishing. They told me that their culture was Fish. There are a few things that stood out from it. The idea of intentionally designing culture isn’t new but this seemed to be explicitly linking culture, emotion and mood. There were 4 principles of FishPlaybe theremake their daychoose your attitude Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 16 May 2024

Presence: exploring real life culture rituals

This episode is part of the Presence project: Presence: Fixing culture starts with your calendar, not your office This is the second episode about rituals - the first one is next to it in the podcast feed, it's an interview with Kursat Ozenc about how rituals can be used to create culture. This episode goes into real life examples. Claudia Wallace talks about Crisp Thursday (Connection)Andy Puleston talks about Pizza Meetings (Connection) and Leaving Speeches (Change)Dan Pink talks about Friday Night Experiments (Creativity)Biz Stone talks about Hack Week at Twitter (Creativity)Dr Heidi Edmondson talks about Ten at Ten (Performance) Heidi has a wonderful new book out - Darkness in the City of Light You can also hear the original episodes that each of these extracts came from by click the links above. I have to say that those whole episodes are worth revising. For example, Andy Puleston talks about how effective the culture was at Radio 1 when it was a series of affiliated tribes and he articulates the role that buildings play in shaping cultures. Each episode teaches something special.  Andy Puleston is now Director of People & Culture at Circulor, an award winning technology business. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 10 May 2024

Presence: our rituals show what matters to us

This episode is part of the Presence project: Presence: Fixing culture starts with your calendar, not your office Kursat Ozenc is a product designer who he teaches at Stanford university, He teaches on the subject that we can all learn from which is the idea that culture can be designed. The specific tool he uses to design culture is the creation of workplace rituals.  Kursat's Substack newsletter Kursat's first book is here and the second, on virtual meetings is here. The reading list for Kursat's course is here Kursat’s book includes the suggestions that: ‘The rituals in our life show what we care about’. Critically then creating rituals demonstrate what our culture values. Kursat gives five use cases for rituals: For changeCreativityPerformanceConflictCommunity If you like this episode you'll also like the episode that accompanies it - which goes into depth about specific rituals that companies have used. Listen to that episode here. A full transcript of the episode is at the website. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 10 May 2024

Presence: Presence starts with positive leadership

Flow is the state of being in which people become so immersed in the joy of their work or activity “that nothing else seems to matter.”Presence is to be in a flow state of connection with others. Here’s the last discussion about the Happiness TrackSign up for the newsletterEmma’s new book SovereignHBR: The Best Leaders Have a Contagious Positive EnergyHBR: Proof That Positive Work Cultures Are More Productive Today is the first of series of podcasts about an idea that needs more consideration in our workplaces. The idea of presence. Emma Seppala is a psychologist and lecturer at the Yale School of Management – she also runs the Women’s Leadership program there. I first spoke to Emma about 6 years ago when I came across her book the Happiness Track. The hypothesis of that book was in many ways the sweet spot of this podcast: the notion that if you make workers happy then they do their better work. Emma had a new book out this week called Sovereign and it felt like a great reason to have a new conversation. The conversation leads into the next block of podcasts which are all about the idea of presence. Over the last 4 years we’ve seen discourse from CEOs about wanting workers back in the office but in many ways they’re putting things the wrong way wrong. A lot of us find ourselves making our way into work and sitting on video calls all day. Or having headphones on because its so noisy. We got home at the end of the day thinking ‘what was the point of that’.  When bosses say they want us to be present in the office, what they actually describe is something different. They talk us about us interacting, having ideas, watercooler moments. Bosses say they want us to be present in the office, but what they really want is presence, for us to be in each others company.For me presence is related to flow Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 24 April 2024

“Workers watch your feet, not your lips” - changing culture at scale

To receive the newsletter and the forthcoming Presence project sign-up here Today’s top episode goes to the heart of an issue that a lot of people raise with me. They say ‘where do you start when changing a culture’. To some extent it’s what the episode about the hospital trust in Barking was about, going in and changing the culture of a huge organisation. I saw one of today’s guests Darren Ashby speak at an event - talking through the specifics of how his company Business Four Zero tried to change the culture of Tesco. Business Four Zero are one of a group of organisations who work with leaders to change company culture. I know there’s a few of these firms. I attended a dazzling event by one firm called Scarlett Abbot in this field about a month ago.  Darren is joined by Atif Sheikh as they talk through the specifics of what they did with firms like Electronic Arts, Aviva and Tesco. They’ve turned some of their work into a book which you can buy here. Some of the things that stood out for me: What’s the number one thing you look for in a high performing culture? How internal are they? How much time are they spending on themselves vs the outside world?Only 28% of workers say they are connected to purposeCulture is what are you committed to as group - emotional commitment of what you want to createValues - before you define your values know that there are 6 core values shared amongst everyone (sometimes called the 6 Pillars of Character - Trust, respect, responsibility, fairness, caring and citizenship). These should not be your differentiator. These are universal basic expectations. You need to define something differentiatingLeaders' role is to bring energy: Satya Nadella told Microsoft’s execs: ‘find the rose petals in the field of sh*t’So how do you elevate a culture? They introduce 2 or 3 critical behaviours that elevate a culture Might be ‘be kinder’ And they build a process of how you might enact those behaviours For example Intercontinental Hotel GroupHad switched from being a hotel owner to a franchise businessCEO needed to remove silosWhat did they need? Too many people in the business didn’t understand how they made money - it made spending decisions hard. So they focussed on ‘think return’Additionally it had become complacent, so they decided to ‘move fast’Finally they agreed to ‘talk straight’ with each other Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 16 April 2024

The future of work? "The manager as a therapist"

Isabel Berwick is a writer and podcaster who focusses on the evolving state of modern work. I’ve celebrated her podcast Working It many times here (here’s her specials on the 4-day week for example, or her special on meeting-free days was essential listening). I love its ability to react rapidly to the biggest news stories of the moment and to drop a snackable episode midweek.I talked to her about her opinions on modern work, going deep on the rapidly changing world of employment and where we’re going next.Isabel has a brand new book out, The Future Proof Career, which she says is for everyone who doesn’t read books about work but wants to be better at navigating it. Recent episodes you might have missedThe importance of trust at work - and why it's on the declineCharles Duhig on how to be a supercommunicator in your job (and your home life)Can improvements to culture fix a broken NHS trust?The Big Ange effect at Tottenham HotspurFrances Frei on the importance of training managers Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 9 April 2024

Getting real with Employee Experience

How should most of us think about the differences between Employee Experience and Employee Engagement. I first spoke to Emma Bridger, who is the author of a well respected book on this topic and the founder of the EX Space, a learning community focussed on raising the bar in the Employee Experience field. Then I picked the brains of Melanie Wheeler who leads People Communications at Sutherland, a firm widely recommended to me as outstanding in Employee Experience. Get in touchSign up for the newsletter Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 27 March 2024

Better conversations, better relationships

Charles Duhigg’s bestseller The Power of Habit was the definitive guide to building and sustaining successful habits. His new book, Supercommunicators, grapples with the knotty topic of creating successful interactions with others. It’s a thorough and dazzling read that has many applications for the way we work (and how we live our lives). We talked about:the single biggest thing that builds psychological safetywhy moving conversation out of small talk into deep discussion proves more satisfying than we expecthow teams should use 'who are we' conversationshow we should think about three different types of conversation (are they looking to be helped, hugged or heard? Read an extract of Charles' book here Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 7 March 2024

Do bonuses actually make us work harder?

Many of us have worked in environments that provided bonuses or rewards for success. Maybe they took the form of team rewards or individual incentives, or end of year profit-share schemes. But do these rewards achieve what they are designed to? Professor Uri Gneezy is the world's foremost expert on the science of incentives - and he comes with a huge warning about what such schemes actually achieve. Eat Sleep Work Repeat is today hosted by Bruce Daisley, Ellen Scott and Matthew Cook. Sign up to the newsletter Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 21 February 2024

Workchat: workplace culture has never been more complicated

This week's Eat Sleep Work Repeat is hosted by Bruce Daisley, Ellen C Scott and Matthew Cook.Roll up roll up as this week we talk the major trends in work and workplace culture and the big stories of the last month. Including:Wellness programs don’t work - in TikTok form, or in Matt’s post on LinkedIn Research from Oxford University looking at the (in)effectiveness of workplace wellbeing interventions at an individual levelChronoworking GymclassgateEllen on Gen Z workersFewer and fewer of us want to go out in the evenings or weekendsThe dystopian prospect of AI interviews Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 6 February 2024

Can better culture improve the results of an NHS Trust?

I was flattered to be invited to visit the NHS trust of Barking, Havering and Redbridge last year. I spent an afternoon meeting the team and seeing the place in action. It was an inspiring question that CEO Matthew Trainer was asking: 'can we improve the results by making it a better culture?' What does that look like? And how is going for them? Matthew Trainer's CEO note at the end of 2023 Video: Inside the Trust Fill in the form: Consider my firm for a future podcast Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 29 January 2024

Building Trust at Work: Trends for 2024

We often overlook the fact that trust is the basis for all good culture. I called out some of the remarkable data on this in the Work In 2024 deck. In Slack’s August 2023 survey of over 10,000 global office workers, trust was the top determinant of employees’ productivity scores. Employees who felt trusted were 2X as productive as those who didn’t. They were 30% more likely to put in extra effort at their jobs. If we don’t feel trusted we’re twice as likely to say we’re looking for a new job. But what role does trust play in the modern company? And how can we build it? Mark McGinn is a senior leader at the communications agency Edelman, he talks to me about their research into trust and how we should seek to build it. Has our organisation replaced government? Increasingly our company is the biggest thing that we believe we can have an impact on.Mark explains that Trust in our organisation is based on four things:Organisational abilityDependabilityIntegrityPurpose You'll strongly enjoy downloading Edelman's Trust Barometer and also Edelman's special Trust at Work report.  Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 17 January 2024

Helping the accidental manager: Trends for 2024

The role of managers are pivotal in our working lives but most managers aren't trained or prepared for the responsibilities that they are given. When we look at the research from Gallup about burnout and why people hate their jobs managers are regarded as having the biggest responsibility. Half of people who say they don't rate their manager say they are looking for jobs. So what can we do to make our relationship with our managers better? I chatted to Anthony Painter from CMI. Download the Work in 2024 deck Chartered Management Institute research on the Accidental Manager82% of workers entering management positions have not had any formal management and leadership trainingonly a quarter of workers (27%) describe their manager as ‘highly effective’of those workers who do not rate their manager, half (50%) plan to leave their company in the next year Follow Anthony on LinkedInFollow Anthony on Twitter Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 10 January 2024

WorkChat: Should part-time workers have to give up on ambition?

Eat Sleep Work Repeat is hosted by Bruce Daisley, Ellen Scott and Matthew Cook. Sign up to the newsletter We talk through the hottest topics in work: New research says that bosses think going part-time signals the end of career ambitionRadio 5 Live's Nihal Arthanayake says he feels alienated as the only brown face in a sea of white at his workplaceBill Gates advocates for the three-day week but doesn't detail who he thinks is going to pay for it Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 12 December 2023

The single thing that every organisation should do to fix culture

Professor Frances Frei is the biggest brain in the field of workplace culture and I was delighted to get another opportunity to talk to her. She explains the one thing that firms should do to fix their cultures (spoiler: train their managers), why she thinks inclusion is a more important element of culture than just diversity. The previous episode with Frances FreiFrances and Anne’s podcast FixableFrances’ and Anne Morriss’ new book Move Fast and Fix ThingsSign up for the newsletter  Quotes from the book that I cited: “One way to build cynicism quickly in an organisation, something we see all the time, by the way - is to ask people for their input and then do very little with the information they give you (and take a long time to even do that)’ Robert McDonald, former CEO of P&G “Organisations are perfectly designed to get the results they get… if you don’t like the results you need to change the design”.  We're often asked for a summary of how to build a workplace where everyone feels welcome. Our short answer is to recruit great people you don't already know, give them interesting work to do, and invest in them as if your company's future depends on it. If they deserve a promotion, give it to them in a timely man-ner. Don't make them wait. Don't make them go to a competitor to get the role, title, and decision rights they already earned on your watch. And in the name of all that is right and just in the world, pay them fairly and equitably for the work they do.” Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 7 November 2023

Is toxic culture driving your team away?

Eat Sleep Work Repeat is hosted by Bruce Daisley, Ellen Scott and Matthew Cook. Sign up to the newsletter Is toxic culture driving your team away?If you’re someone whose job it is think about culture, or maybe you’re a boss who has tried to communicate values to your team then today’s episode is an essential listen.Donald Sull and Charlie Sull are a father and son research team who have discovered extraordinary insights into values and what they look like in the real world.Here are some articles to get you going to understand the world of the Sulls:Toxic Culture Is Driving the Great ResignationThe Toxic Culture Gap Shows Companies Are Failing WomenWhy leaders need to worry about toxic culture? Charlie and Donald have a business that focusses on this called Culture X. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 2 November 2023

WorkChat: are you ready to declare your workplace relationships?

Eat Sleep Work Repeat is hosted by Bruce Daisley, Ellen Scott and Matthew Cook. Sign up to the newsletter This week we go deep on the latest news about work. ITV tell staff to declare ‘friendships’Moderation staff at Facebook are suing over PTSDBBC staff given help for stress levels'We Had To Remove This Post' - brilliant novella by Hanna BervoetsOobah Butler’s Amazon show on Channel 4Reddit anti workReddit r/LateStageCapitalismMatt’s final comment about having orgasms to boost productivityBig Train sketch: 'no wanking in the office please' Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 24 October 2023

WorkChat: Is work heading for a freelance future?

Eat Sleep Work Repeat is hosted by Bruce Daisley, Ellen C Scott and Matthew Cook. Sign up to the newsletter This week we go deep on the latest news about work. We discuss:Two thirds of bosses expect a return to the office by 2036KPMG CEO surveyDavid Foster Wallace - This is Water commencement speechShonda Rhimes “Whenever you see me somewhere succeeding in one area of my life, that almost certainly means I am failing in another area of my life”80% of remote workers claim to have two jobsEmail sign-offs are changingCoffee badging as a protest against being in the officeSnail girl jobs (and the toxicity of ‘trends’ about women working less)The gendered nature of WFH assessment (participants in research were less likely to choose to hire working mothers than childless women) Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 17 October 2023

I’m loving Big Ange instead

Sign up for the newsletter What Ange Postecoglou changed at Spurs in his first 100 days: ‘The mood has been transformed’ Charlie writes about the oratory of Ange Postecoglou Last week I read something wonderful about the culture of Tottenham Hotspur, I contacted the writer and it felt like it was worth putting out quickly. We’ve got a couple of podcast recorded with Matt and Ellen so we’ll be back for a fuller episode next week.Ange Postecoglou has been the manager of Spurs, Tottenham Hotspur, for around a hundred days. In that time he’s started something of a transformation. And I can tell that because the Spurs fans I know how have started smiling. Spurs have started the season well, currently sitting 2nd in the Premier League. But more than that the players seem to be happy and are playing exciting football. There was a brilliant article by Charlie Ecceshare from The Athletic looking into the culture of the club under Ange, the article talked about how the mood of the club has been transformed. For anyone interested in the impact that cultural change can create it was a fascinating read, full of specifics and clear actions. Aren’t all of us looking to change the mood of our jobs? I got in touch with Charlie and we talked about Postecoglou, culture and the impact that culture has on results.  In the show note you’ll find links to Charlie’s articles, YouTube clips of some team talks we discuss and some other things that you might find of interest, like an interview with Gary Lineker.  Fabulous interview with Gary LinekerBig Ange motivational speech Thank you to Charlie, all of the articles mentioned are in the show notes. What a fabulous discussion. I’m grateful for him taking the time to chat to me. If you’re interested in workplace culture you can sign up to the newsletter in the show notes - and also check out previous episodes on Liverpool FC, Barcelona and the All Blacks. Further listening:Inside Klopp's early days at LiverpoolA close look at Barcelona's cultureThe culture of the All BlacksReinventing the culture of the England team with Gareth Southgate Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 5 October 2023

Psychological safety - setting the record straight

Eat Sleep Work Repeat is hosted by Bruce Daisley, Ellen C Scott and Matthew Cook. Ellen is away this week - we were working hard to squeeze an elite guest in. Amy Edmondson is the most renowned organisational psychologist in the world. In other words she's looked to more than anyone else for the answers of how to fix work. In this in depth discussion she talks us through what she understands by psychological safety, how any of us can create it and what she believes the best team structure is to achieve it. We're also joined by Octavius Black, founder of Mind Gym, who provide behavioural science based interventions for lots of the biggest companies in the world. Amy's new book is The Right Kind of Wrong Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 29 September 2023

Are you having fun?

Eat Sleep Work Repeat is hosted by Bruce Daisley, Ellen C Scott and Matthew Cook. Sign up for the Make Work Better newsletter Catherine Price is a science and health writer who has written a couple of sensationally timely books.Firstly How to Break Up With Your PhoneSecondly, and today’s discussion focusses on this, The Power of Fun I was put on to it by Elle Hunt’s Power of Fun article in The GuardianMemorise it: fun is playful connected flow Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 22 September 2023

WorkChat: Hang on, was the office stressing us out all along?

Sign up for the Make Work Better newsletter Eat Sleep Work Repeat is hosted by Bruce Daisley, Ellen C Scott and Matthew Cook. Ellen wrote about her learnings about being a managerDespite government threats of legal action Cambridgeshire council are continuing their evidence-led trial of the 4-day week. “Nine in ten councils are struggling with job recruitment and retention and a four-day working week could be the answer” Ellen mentions this article on Stylist about boundaries (registration required)Half of the employees of Grindr were fired after the firm issued a RTO order. This included 100% of the firm’s trans employees. As Matt points out in the show trans employees are subject to the legislative whims of different states in the US and understandably try to locate in safe places. We talk about the World Values Survey report "What the world thinks about work"People in the UK are least likely to say work is important in their life. It's still seems pretty high, 73% of the UK public say work is very or rather important in their life - but significantly lower than other countries. Other western nations such as Italy, Spain, Sweden, France and Norway all rank much higher than the UK on this measure, with more than nine in 10 saying work is important in their life.Headline warning: This is not a new development. the share of the British public who say work is important in their life has hardly changed in three decades But there are big generational differences in views on whether work should always come first. One of the most interesting charts has been millennial's views crashing: it went from a hustle culture high of 41% in 2009 to 14% in 2022. That is a huge shift in attitude Libby Sander is an internationally renowned expert on work and the workplace, the MBA Director and Assistant Professor of Organisational Behaviour at Bond University. She is a leading thinker on understanding the future of work, and how we can reimagine it to live more meaningful and creative lives.Read Libby on RTO Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 15 September 2023

The world's best performance coach explains how he transforms teams

I’m joined again by new cohosts Ellen C Scott and Matthew Cook. Buy Belonging Owen Eastwood is the most in-demand team performance coach in the world He's earned that reputation by delivering break-through results with a diverse range of teams from Gareth Southgate’s England team and the England women’s team, to the senior leadership team of NATO. His former clients represent an elite range of teams who have gone on to achieve incredible victories. We wanted to understand how he did it. What does he say? What does he ask? Eastwood’s approach is consistent. By zooming out and pointing our fleeting contribution to legacy he urges teams to think about their ‘Us’ story. For me this suggests that what he’s actually doing is emphasising a powerful shared identity. In my mind I would see this as activating a visceral bond of community, he chooses to label it as ‘belonging’. That distinction ends up feeling semantic when presented with what his approach achieves. This week on the podcast I’m joined by new co-hosts Ellen Scott and Matthew Cook as we talk to Owen and debate purpose, identity and belonging. It’s a truly brilliant listen. Follow Owen on LinkedInJoe Lycett’s remarkable special - the last 20 minutes of this are astonishing viewingEllen on thinking about leaving work on time Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 8 September 2023

WorkChat: a broader perspective on work starts here

A few months ago I put out a call asking for other voices to get involved in the podcast and I’m delighted today to add Ellen C Scott and Matthew Cook to Eat Sleep Work Repeat. You may have read Ellen’s brilliant writing in The Stylist where she is the Deputy Digital Editor and previously in Metro. She writes and edits pieces on work, mental health, relationships, and more. Here’s her own Substack on work. She is also working on fiction and is represented by The Soho Agency.Matt/Matthew is the founder of theSHIFT, an award-winning learning consultancy that specialises in cultural change inside organisations. He’s basically a people enthusiast who has turned it into his job. I’ll be honest I love talking about work but I was worried that my own perspective might be a bit limiting. First and foremost I ended up as a boss and whether you intend it to or not that skews your perspective. Ellen and Matthew are here to help give a broader view. We loved recording the first episode and hopefully great things are to come. You’ll find more on work at the ESWR website and the Make Work Better newsletter. Today’s links:Ellen’s post about AIThe rise of Millennial MomagersMcKinsey claims to have cracked the formula for hybrid working‘Sorry but productivity is lower at home’ - the article and the discussion of it is covered hereHybrid workers are spending fully half of their work time in meetingsMaker vs Manager ScheduleThe benefit of ‘collective effervescence’ (there’s loads about this in Fortitude, p168)Erin Meyer on the cultural differences of giving feedback Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 1 September 2023

FIXED WITH INTRO How to build a truly engaged team

Sorry for duplicate - the previous version had no intro! If you liked this I actually shared a lot of the data on the newsletter a couple of weeks ago - read that here. Today's episode is an in depth exploration of the latest Gallup Global Workplace Report, Anna Sawyer, a Principal at Gallup takes us through the findings - and the implications for all leaders. Get your hands on Gallup’s ‘State of the Global Workplace Report’ Here’s Anna on LinkedIn I loved the Gallup report on employee burnout (and I cited the results in the show) We talk a little about the Gallup Q12 criteria that help them form their results, people are asked:I know what is expected of me at work.I have the materials and equipment I need to do my work right.At work, I have the opportunity to do what I do best every day.In the last seven days, I have received recognition or praise for doing good work.My supervisor, or someone at work, seems to care about me as a person.There is someone at work who encourages my development.At work, my opinions seem to count.The mission or purpose of my company makes me feel my job is important.My associates or fellow employees are committed to doing quality work.I have a best friend at work.In the last six months, someone at work has talked to me about my progress.This last year, I have had opportunities at work to learn and grow. Friendship is ‘the privilege of having been seen by someone and the equal privilege of having been granted the sight of the essence of another’ - David Whyte Read the meta-analysis (I *think* only 2020 is released at the moment)Findings: Median percent differences between top-quartile and bottom-quartile units were:• 10% in customer loyalty/engagement• 23% in profitability• 18% in productivity (sales)• 14% in productivity (production records and evaluations)• 18% in turnover for high-turnover organisations (those with more than 40% annualised turnover)• 43% in turnover for low-turnover organisations (those with 40% or lower annualised turnover)• 64% in safety incidents (accidents)• 81% in absenteeism• 28% in shrinkage (theft)• 58% in patient safety incidents (mortality and falls)• 41% in quality (defects)• 66% in wellbeing (net thriving employees)• 13% in organisational citizenship (participation) View the Science Behind the Questions Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 29 June 2023

How to build a truly engaged team

If you liked this I actually shared a lot of the data on the newsletter a couple of weeks ago - read that here. Today's episode is an in depth exploration of the latest Gallup Global Workplace Report, Anna Sawyer, a Principal at Gallup takes us through the findings - and the implications for all leaders. Get your hands on Gallup’s ‘State of the Global Workplace Report’ Here’s Anna on LinkedIn I loved the Gallup report on employee burnout (and I cited the results in the show) We talk a little about the Gallup Q12 criteria that help them form their results, people are asked:I know what is expected of me at work.I have the materials and equipment I need to do my work right.At work, I have the opportunity to do what I do best every day.In the last seven days, I have received recognition or praise for doing good work.My supervisor, or someone at work, seems to care about me as a person.There is someone at work who encourages my development.At work, my opinions seem to count.The mission or purpose of my company makes me feel my job is important.My associates or fellow employees are committed to doing quality work.I have a best friend at work.In the last six months, someone at work has talked to me about my progress.This last year, I have had opportunities at work to learn and grow. Friendship is ‘the privilege of having been seen by someone and the equal privilege of having been granted the sight of the essence of another’ - David Whyte Read the meta-analysis (I *think* only 2020 is released at the moment)Findings: Median percent differences between top-quartile and bottom-quartile units were:• 10% in customer loyalty/engagement• 23% in profitability• 18% in productivity (sales)• 14% in productivity (production records and evaluations)• 18% in turnover for high-turnover organisations (those with more than 40% annualised turnover)• 43% in turnover for low-turnover organisations (those with 40% or lower annualised turnover)• 64% in safety incidents (accidents)• 81% in absenteeism• 28% in shrinkage (theft)• 58% in patient safety incidents (mortality and falls)• 41% in quality (defects)• 66% in wellbeing (net thriving employees)• 13% in organisational citizenship (participation) View the Science Behind the Questions Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 29 June 2023

Is the 4 day week a cult that we can all get behind?

Alex's book: Work less, do more Make Work Better newsletter covered the 4 day week trials For today’s episode I went to meet Alex Soujung Kim Pang. Alex has written a lot about our relationship with work, first in his book Rest and now in his book WORK LESS, DO MORE which is a refreshed version of Shorter. When we first spoke the evidence for shorter working was a series of quirky stories of pioneering firms, frequently led by maverick bosses. In the last three years the landscape for shorter working (encompassing all manner of adaptations like four day weeks, compressed hours, 9 day fortnights and more) has transformed. Alex himself has played a role for 4 Day Week Global helping to design the mechanics of programs for test firms. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 23 June 2023

AI and work...it's imminent

Sign up for the newsletter We’re in a stage place with AI right now where for most of us it’s still a parlour trick. Something that we’ve seen create images of the Pope in bling or summon up meal planners that we’ll never use. But we’ve not really seen how it will impact our jobs. Along the way there have been some huge claims:An MIT study said that knowledge work could become 37% faster and more effective simply by using Chat GPTA study by Github found that software developers were 55% faster using Github CopilotAnecdotally I have heard the same from software developers. And in aggregate there’s certainly a chance that we’re not thinking of the implications of these things. The economist Paul Krugman this week said that if AI is able to deliver an additional 1.5% of growth per year to the economy then we should stop worrying about national debt and a percentage of GDP. Of course, he would say that his own extrapolations on these things are just an attempt to float ideas. That’s why today’s podcast was so important for me to feature. I got the chance to chat to Alexia Cambon, Senior Director of Modern Work Research at Microsoft and Nick Hedderman, Senior Director of Modern Work, Microsoft. The discussion has implications for all of us, and how quickly we set about changing the way we work Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 9 June 2023

Making the Case for Good Jobs

Zeynep Ton is the author of the Good Jobs Strategy - which holds the honour of being the book I refer to the most when it comes to talking about work. In that book she set about making the case for firms to create good jobs for their employees, not just for the moral reason but because it was a route to faster growth.  Now she returns with a new book, The Case for Good Jobs, which not only explains the reasoning for creating better working conditions for workers, but also how any firm can set about doing it. At the heart of the discussion is a recognition that workers want to do a good job - and often find obstacles in their way. MIT Sloan Review: When Doing Less Adds Up to MoreThe Obstacles to Creating Good Jobs Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 26 May 2023

The Importance of Touch

Are you touch starved? Do you feel a touch hunger in your life? Michael Banissy is a psychologist whose work focusses on the importance of physical connection between people, he styles himself as part of a group of ‘scientists who stroke’. Touch has become sigmatised by the actions of those who have misused it, to the extent that many of us have become fearful of touching the arm or shoulder of others. Michael Banissy gives a compelling case for appropriate touch, and asks us to rethink the role it plays in our lives. His book Why We Touch is out now. (It’s called Touch Matters in the US). Read more: How touch changes our decision making Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 18 May 2023

What *is* the future of work? A discussion with Dror Poleg

An episode today that is a reflection on where work is going and what implications there are for cities, for workers and for life.  Dror Poleg is a writer and commentator who thinks about how the internet is disrupting our lives. What sets him apart is his ability to see second and third order effects of change. Dror Poleg's newsletter (and draft book of the future of work) can be found at his website. Join me at Microsoft's event on AI and the future of workJoin me on 25th May at 12.30pm (13:30 CET) when I’ll be speaking at Microsoft’s Employee Experience event. The event is focussed on developments in emerging workplace technologies, such as AI, and how we can optimise employee experience to help balance productivity, engagement, and wellbeing of employees.I’ll be delivering a keynote speech and taking part in a fireside chat with Microsoft’s Alexia Cambon and Nick Hedderman about how we can implement AI in the workplace to build the future of work. To register for your free seat, click the link here. If you're interested in becoming a co-host on Eat Sleep Work Repeat get in touch: eatsleepworkrepeat.com/host Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 11 May 2023

Curiosity, creativity and AI

Today’s discussion should land you right in the sweetspot of thinking about AI for your own job by taking a step back, by asking yourself how you can connect with AI and why you should. Today’s guest Professor Costas Andriopoulos explain curiosity is the engine of creativity. And by striving to be curious our minds will surprise us with the creativity that results. There was a wonderful piece of work five years ago by Francesco Gino from Harvard Business School that looked into curiosity. It found that of more than 3,000 employees from a wide range of firms and industries, only about 24% reported feeling curious in their jobs on a regular basis, and about 70% said they face barriers to asking more questions at work.  In a study of 120 employees it was found that natural curiosity was associated with better job performance, as evaluated by their direct bosses. In the survey of more than 3,000 employees mentioned earlier, 92% credited curious people with bringing new ideas into teams and organizations and viewed curiosity as a catalyst for job satisfaction, motivation, innovation, and high performance. Professor Costas Andriopoulous is a Professor of Management and Associate Dean for Entrepreneurship at Bayes Business School, City of London University. Links for today: Professor Costas' book: Purposeful Curiosity: How asking the right questions will change your life Promptbase - is a marketplace for AI prompts (you’ll get the best value from it if you sign up for a paid subscription on Midjourney). Here’s my own experiments If you’re interested in generative AI for business then the posts by Ethan Mollick are essential to follow (‘Come up with names for a pasta restaurant Now read the Igor Naming Guide on how to name companies, give me better suggestions. Check those names for trademark violations. Make up unique names that won't violate trademark, explain them’)  I find that having inspiration can prompt your own imagination and this gallery can give you ideas. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 20 March 2023

Is Work Destined For Generational Discord?

Sign up for the Make Work Better newsletter  Ellen Scott is the deputy digital editor of Stylist and someone who has achieved recognition for having a sharp eye when it comes to observing the changing face of work. Ellen was one of the first voices to pick up on the TikTok trend of Quiet Quitting, she's written about 'the ambi-work' movement and continues to give voice to the challenges facing Gen Z and Millennial workers. We talk about whether is as fair a deal today as it always was, and what firms could do to improve things. You can read some of her past articles here You'll find Joel Golby's final London Rental Property of the Week linked here. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 13 March 2023

Brains, hormones and time - the invisible causes of better workplace culture

Are there forces at work that might impact the way work feels? Could we use those forces to make work better? This discussion with Robin Dunbar and Tracey Camilleri took me to places I hadn't expected to go. That hormones, our brains and time would play a part in the relationships we forge at work isn't something that you would expect to find in a company's culture document, but as you'll hear today they forge a vital component of better team work. Hormones are triggered by emotional interactions with other humans. Uniquely they only tend to work face-to-face. Hormones can help us build affinity with others in a powerful way that is often overlooked. Brain-size impacts the connections we have with those people. At the core of human experience is our closest one (or two) relationships. There’s a small circle of 4 or 5 people who sit at the heart of our lives, and up to 15 who make up the majority of our time. And that time is critical for the strength of those connections. We spent 40% of our time with our 5 closest relationships, and 60% with the top 15. By spending time we can become close friends with people in our lives. The Social Brain by Tracey Camilleri, Samantha Rockey and Robin Dunbar is out now. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 24 February 2023

Fixing work's people problem(s)

Today’s episode is a discussion with Amy Gallo. During the pandemic I had a wonderful discussion about work and where it was going and I was delighted to have another conversation with her two years on.  Amy is the author of Getting Along: How to Work with Anyone (Even Difficult People) and The HBR Guide to Dealing with Conflict. She also co-hosts the Women at Work podcast, and is a contributing editor at Harvard Business Review, where she writes about workplace dynamics. Articles mentioned:The Harvard study of human life & wellbeing: The secret to happiness? Here’s some advice from the longest-running study on happinessStop Telling Women They Have Imposter Syndrome  The myth of bringing your full, authentic self to work  Amy wrote a wonderful article on psychological safety this week. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 17 February 2023

Inside the ideas factory - demystifying creativity

Jeremy shares his: free bonus chapter Jeremy Utley leads some of the most popular courses on creativity and innovation at the d.school of Stanford University. I was delighted to see that he was making his teaching of such popular courses available to a wider audience and chased him for an interview. This is one of his first interviews to talk about his brand new book Ideaflow. In it he discusses the way to have good ideas, and why most of us aren't willing to do what is required. I loved this discussion. Buy Ideaflow here - and find out more about Jeremy and his co-author, Perry Klebahn, here. Sign up for the podcast newsletter here. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 19 October 2022

Rory Sutherland explores Fortitude

Sign up to hear more about Radix Big Tent Rory Sutherland is one of the most respected brains in the advertising industry, a man whose early endorsement of behavioural economics helped popularise the nascent science. He's also a regular writer for The Spectator and Vice Chief of Ogilvy Group. Rory joins me to interview to talk about my new book, Fortitude, which has become a Sunday Times Bestseller and tackles the myth of resilience.The event was hosted by a brilliant organisation called Radix Big Tent. Radix Big Trent gives a platform for non-partisan conversations about big policy issues, giving a voice to people and places. It provokes and promotes new conversations about the regeneration and renewal of our society in a non-partisan way, inspiring practical actions which demonstrate the value of political intervention and delivering real change in left behind areas.It convenes Summits, Festivals, physical and online events around the country that engage local leaders and ordinary people, bringing them into contact with national policy makers and influencers. If you would like to hear more please sign up on radixuk.org Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 5 October 2022

'Wednesday plus one' & the 4-day week

Lots of discussion right now about firms trying to kick start their workplace culture. I wanted to explore conversations with leaders who were leading experiments in how to make things feel different. In what prove to be a pair of candid conversations I talk to two firms who are asking the question if workplaces can be more motivated by trying to vary the ingredients. John Sill tells us how his firm The Foundation are trying out Wednesday plus one, then John Readman tells us how Modo25 have become the latest firm to try the four-day week - with some learnings along the way. If you like this you can sign up to the Make Work Better newsletter Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 27 September 2022

We've never needed stories more - a masterclass by a story coach from The Moth

Come along to one of my free events in September We all tell stories all of the time, but what makes a magical, memorable story? What pitfalls should we avoid? This was an issue that I was thinking about. Presentations are stories, and we deliver presentations every day. In my own investigation I found real value in the book by the storytelling organisation The Moth. I was beyond excited when I saw they were releasing a UK edition of the book. One of the authors Kate Tellers joins me to discuss The Moth's approach to making memorable stories. Kate is a senior director at The Moth, helping people transform into storytellers. But she explains something even more valuable, of how The Moth run workshops that allow colleagues to better connect with each other by sharing their stories with each other.  How to Tell a Story: The Essential Guide to Memorable Storytelling from The Moth Carolyn Martin's story about becoming a Catholic Sister (such a beautiful story)Josh Broder's story about being an extra in a huge film (this is incredible)Kate's own Moth stories are here Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 15 September 2022

Professor Sophie Scott takes us into the brain

Professor Sophie Scott is the UK's most recognisable neuroscientist, famed for her passion and her ability to excite interest in a complex field. Her new book, The Brain - Ten Things You Should Know is out now and I got in touch to discuss what any of us can learn about the brain. It's a wonderful discussion that included one detail that stopped me in my tracks. Listen to Professor Sophie Scott on our previous episode about laughter Royal Institution Christmas Lecture Why we laugh Cover image by Hugging Face AI Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 8 September 2022

"Men have no friends and women bear the burden”

Lots of my favourite podcasts have gone on summer break, so I wanted to keep putting some episodes out. But maybe you don't want something that is too work related in the midst of the summer, so this is an episode that is more psychology and life than workplace culture. It's a lovely discussion with Max Dickins author of 'Billy No Mates'. I got so much from the book - and from the discussion. Max reflects on the geezerish persona he adopts with workmen in his house and wonders if it's a performance and if it is a performance is it by him, or the workman or both of them. He considers how for many men adult life becomes a process of refusing to demonstrate - and then refusing to experience - joy. As someone asked of him, 'what happened to these men'? The article that the episode is titled after is here - we discuss it in the show: “Men have no friends and women carry the burden” Max's book is available now. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 7 August 2022

Abandoning offices - not so fast!

To find out more about the workplace culture course go to the website or the book page. After recent episodes have made a case that the office might be on the way out, today is a voice who dares to say otherwise. Tom Goodwin is an active voice in media - operating somewhere between provocateur and consultant. He has been voted a top 10 voice in Marketing by LinkedIn, one of 30 people to follow on Twitter by Business Insider, and a 'must follow' by Fast Company.  In the conversation we discuss how there's a danger that we might be turning our backs on something special in the office, 'dog mode' and how the best technology is the technology that we have available to us now. Tom's new book is a total rewrite of his first book Digital Darwinism. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 27 July 2022

The internet's favourite chart makers get emotional

If you're a user of social media, whether Instagram, Twitter or LinkedIn you'll have seen the work of today's guest. Sign up for the free Winning Workplace Culture course here if you prefer Fortitude.Get the Make Work Better newsletter here Liz Fosslien is half of Liz and Mollie whose perceptive dissections of contemporary anxieties have won hundreds of thousands of fans. Liz talks through her process of creating these atoms of insight and how the response from viewers inspired them to write a new book about how to cope with the major emotions in our lives. A lovely warm summer conversation. You can follow Liz and Mollie on social media - or buy their new book Big Feelings here Norrie Norrie Norrie Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 14 July 2022

Community: how a table changed a culture

A wonderful discussion that I think has got immense to richness to it. I chat to the boss of St John's Ambulance Martin Houghton-Brown (Martin on Twitter). I was struck with the power of the lessons about connection and identity - we often find ourselves throwing these terms around casually but Martin's testimony brings it vividly to life. Find out more about St John's Ambulance - become a volunteerDonate to St John's AmbulanceParkrun research: volunteers see a bigger health uplift than the runners Pre-order Fortitude and get a workplace culture course for free (before 8th July 2022) The book is about resilience - how we get it wrong, and where it really lies. There are a lot of mistakes made about resilience and increasingly our teams are getting fed up hearing us talk about it. Fortitude explores where resilience really lives. The early reviews on the book are sensational. Steven Bartlett said:‘This is a truly refreshing, captivating and important book that shifted my perception on a topic I thought I knew! A must read.’ Gary Lineker said:‘A book that confirms what I've always believed, that we can't be resilient on our own. In fact resilience is about all of us being stronger than any of us.’ Oliver Burkeman said:‘An important and well-timed book. A fascinating and important pushback against the narrow,  joy-eroding version of 'resilience' that would leave us to sink or swim alone, Fortitude is an indispensable guide to a more energising, human, and effective approach to working and thriving in a post-pandemic world’ Noreena Hertz, author of The Lonely Century said: 'A thought provoking exploration of what it takes to get through tough times and a compelling endorsement of the power of others to hold us up’. Nadiya Hussain said:'A much needed book that unfolds the surprising secrets of resilience. Something I never knew i needed to read but I'm so glad I did, it’s opened up a whole angle of thinking' Alastair Campbell said:‘A fascinating analysis of resilience - what it is, what is isn’t and why, when we develop it together, it becomes something better and more important, fortitude. It seems that resilience is a team game.’ Photo by Jorge De Jorge on Unsplash Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 28 June 2022

Fortitude, Winning Workplace Culture and the Future Forum

Two things on the podcast today - at the end of the episode there is a discussion with former guest, Brian Elliott from Slack's Future Forum. Ahead of that I want to make an announcement about what I've been working on - with my new book Fortitude. Fortitude is an investigation into the elusive idea of resilience, a book that discovers that resilience is a area filled with mistakes, misdirection and over-promise. The book finds the true secrets of resilience. You can find out all of about the book here or you can receive my workplace culture course for free if you pre-order it now. The Future Forum book 'How the Future Works' is available now. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 7 June 2022

Are we in denial? is Work From Anywhere our destiny?

“There are two kinds of companies: One is going to embrace work-from-anywhere, and the second is in denial — I feel those companies will lose their workforce. You have to make a choice, as a leader, what kind of company you want to lead” (source) The words of today's guest have stayed with me for the last few months. I'm so delighted to talk to Professor Raj Choudhury from Harvard Business School who will possibly wake you up from a self-created illusion. He'll explain:why WFA is inevitablethe role that top talent have in redefining work for everyonewhy 25% is a magic amount of timewhy WFA presents a win-win-win solution for usI was so looking forward to this and it doesn't disappoint.Read Professor Choudhury's HBR cover article.Here is the audio clip I mentioned. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 18 May 2022

Dan Coyle can fix your culture

If you find yourself becoming interested in the magic of workplace culture one of the go to authors of the subject is today's guest, Dan Coyle. Dan's 2018 book The Culture Code allowed him to go deep with some of the most successful cultures in the world - in the arenas of business, sport and even the military. He's returning after the blazing success of the Culture Code with a book that gives more of the energy of that title but drawn into a workbook, The Culture Playbook - imagine something like a journal with prompts of what to write. He joined me for a discussion where we reflect on the challenges of the last 2 years and what any organisation should be thinking about as they set about creating a winning, forward-looking culture. If you like this sign up for the newsletter - Make Work Better - for a special announcement in 3 weeks Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 3 May 2022

The world's WFH expert is confident for offices

We're going deeper into the evidence today with two brilliant guests. Anne Raimondi is COO of Asana who were smart enough to have started a major piece of research into how work is evolving just before the world turned upside down. We're also joined by the most in demand brain in the world right now, Professor Nick Bloom. Nick is Professor WFH, an economist from Stanford University who has been researching remote working for over a decade. Along the way we talk about how the biggest innovations in remote working are yet to come - and are coming from mindblowing places. We talk the changing expectations of Gen Z workers, why Nick doesn't believe we should be giving up our office just yet. We hear where the sweetspot of hybrid working is right now and why a little less freedom and a little more co-ordination is the order of the day. I was desperately trying to get Nick on the podcast and to land Anne Raimondi at the same time is a wonderful stroke of luck. Asana's Anatomy of Work Report 2022 is available here. You can access Nick's work here.Make Work Better on Nick's work **SIGN UP FOR FREE**More from Nick A brilliant listen. Some key findings from the Asana report: 37% of workers say that they don’t have a clear start or finish time to their working day – rising to 53% for Gen Z employeesManagers spend the most time everyday on work coordination (62%)As an organisation grows so does work about work. Employees at medium and large companies spend 59% of their day on it. That’s 5% more time than small businesses Compared to one year ago:42% are spending more time on email 40% are spending more time on video calls 52% are multitasking more during virtual meetings 56% feel they need to respond immediately to notifications Despite nearly half of employees (47%) finding it easier to concentrate at home, 41% feel more isolated when working remotely    Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 26 April 2022

Understanding the status game of work

Status is a fundamental need for humans. Such a fascinating discussion today. I recently read Will Storr's brilliant book The Status Game and was so taken with it I invited him on the podcast. He quotes Professor Brian Boyd when he says that we:‘naturally pursue status with ferocity: we all relentlessly, if unconsciously, try to raise our own standing by impressing peers, and naturally if unconsciously, evaluate others in terms of their standing’. In study after study it is found that our wellbeing depends on the degree that we feel respected by other people. One study found that the attainment off status of its loss was ‘the strongest predictor of long-term positive and negative feelings’ in subjects. I wanted to pick Will's brains to hear more of this - but also to understand how these mechanisms impact us at work. If you're interested in psychology or just a bit of people watching you'll love the reframing that this discussion provides for us. Along the way Will gives us the definitive take on why Will Smith slapped Chris Rock at the Oscars. Sign up to the newsletter Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/eatsleepworkrepeat. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Transcribed - Published: 11 April 2022

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