Tapesearch Logo

Just One Thing - with Michael Mosley

BBC

Science, Health & Fitness

4.7 • 1K Ratings

Overview

If time is tight, what's the one thing that you should be doing to improve your health and wellbeing? Michael Mosley reveals surprisingly simple top tips that are scientifically proven to change your life.

99 Episodes

Deep Calm - Episode 5: Using Music

Sit back, leave behind the cares of the day and take a sonic journey with Dr Michael Mosley. In this new podcast series, designed to help you let go and unwind, each episode focuses on a scientifically-proven technique for activating the body’s built-in relaxation response, and takes a deep dive to explore what’s happening inside as we find stillness and calm.Most of us instinctively know that music can have a huge impact on our mood. But it can also be an effective tool to tap into your body’s relaxation response. Plus thought loops, soundwaves and an encounter with the Organ of Corti.Guest: Stefan Koelsch, professor at the University of Bergen in Norway.Series Producer, sound design and mix engineer: Richard Ward Researcher: William Hornbrook Production Manager: Maria Simons Editor: Zoë Heron Specially composed music by Richard Atkinson (Mcasso) A BBC Studios Audio production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 17 May 2024

Deep Calm - Episode 4: Using the Power of Nature

Sit back, leave behind the cares of the day and take a sonic journey with Dr Michael Mosley. In this new podcast series, designed to help you let go and unwind, each episode focuses on a scientifically-proven technique for activating the body’s built-in relaxation response, and takes a deep dive to explore what’s happening inside as we find stillness and calm.What is it about the natural world that has such a positive impact upon our physiology - slowing our heart rate and blood pressure, settling our thoughts and so much more? One theory is that it’s connected to the repeating patterns in nature - fractals - and Michael discovers that we live in a fractal universe.Guest: Richard Taylor, professor at the University of Oregon.Series Producer, sound design and mix engineer: Richard Ward Researcher: William Hornbrook Production Manager: Maria Simons Editor: Zoë Heron Specially composed music by Richard Atkinson (Mcasso) Extract from "Fractal compositions No.1” composed by Severin Su in collaboration with 13&9 Design. A BBC Studios Audio production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 16 May 2024

Deep Calm - Episode 3: Using Your Imagination

Sit back, leave behind the cares of the day and take a sonic journey with Dr Michael Mosley. In this new podcast series, designed to help you let go and unwind, each episode focuses on a scientifically-proven technique for activating the body’s built-in relaxation response, and takes a deep dive to explore what’s happening inside as we find stillness and calm.If you imagine yourself somewhere safe and relaxing, using something called Guided Imagery, you can activate the body’s relaxation response. Plus brainwaves, pupils and thought-birds.Guest: Katarzyna Zemla, PhD candidate SWPS / PJATK Universities in Warsaw.Series Producer, sound design and mix engineer: Richard Ward Researcher: William Hornbrook Editor: Zoë Heron Specially composed music by Richard Atkinson (Mcasso) A BBC Studios Audio production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 15 May 2024

Deep Calm - Episode 2: Relaxing Your Body

Sit back, leave behind the cares of the day and take a sonic journey with Dr Michael Mosley. In this new podcast series, designed to help you let go and unwind, each episode focuses on a scientifically-proven technique for activating the body’s built-in relaxation response, and takes a deep dive to explore what’s happening inside as we find stillness and calm.Deliberately tensing and then relaxing groups of muscles all through the body is a potent technique for engaging your body’s relaxation response. We also encounter the magnificently-named Golgi tendon organ afferent nerve cells, and the interconnected nodes of the brain.Guest: Ian Robertson, professor at Trinity College Dublin.Series Producer, sound design and mix engineer: Richard Ward Researcher: William Hornbrook Editor: Zoë Heron Specially composed music by Richard Atkinson (Mcasso) A BBC Studios Audio production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 14 May 2024

Deep Calm - Episode 1: Using Your Breath

Sit back, leave behind the cares of the day and take a sonic journey with Dr Michael Mosley. In this new podcast series, designed to help you let go and unwind, each episode focuses on a scientifically-proven technique for activating the body’s built-in relaxation response, and takes a deep dive to explore what’s happening inside as we find stillness and calm.By deliberately slowing your breath you can help bring peace and calm to your body and mind. We discover a sweet spot (it’s around six breath per minute but varies from individual to individual) where bodily rhythms align to enhance this relaxation response, and encounter the wandering Vagus Nerve with its central, critical role in all of this.Guest: Mara Mather, professor at the University of Southern California.Series Producer, sound design and mix engineer: Richard Ward Researcher: William Hornbrook Production Manager: Maria Simons Editor: Zoë Heron Specially composed music by Richard Atkinson (Mcasso) A BBC Studios Audio production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 13 May 2024

Welcome to Deep Calm - with Michael Mosley

Sit back and take a sonic journey with Dr Michael Mosley as he focuses on scientifically-proven techniques for activating your body's built-in relaxation response.

Transcribed - Published: 13 May 2024

Cook from Scratch

Michael Mosley investigates how cooking from scratch can be a simple way to eat healthier and avoid ultra-processed foods, many of which are associated with an increased risk of diseases like cancer, type 2 diabetes and heart disease. It doesn’t need to be complicated - simple recipes using tinned and frozen foods can be a great way to get started. Michael speaks to Dr Emily Leeming, a nutrition scientist from King's College London, to find out why cooking your own meals can be so beneficial for your gut microbiome, your waistline and your mental health. Meanwhile, our volunteer Richard cooks up a storm!Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small Editor: Zoë Heron Commissioning Editor: Rhian Roberts A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4

Transcribed - Published: 9 May 2024

Nordic Walking

We all know that walking is hugely beneficial for our health and wellbeing, but we can get even fitter, and use nearly twice as many muscles, by introducing some poles and a simple technique. Join Michael Mosley as he delves into the science of Nordic walking to find out how it can enhance our walks by burning more calories and helping to ease back pain. He speaks to Dr Jennifer Reed from the University of Ottawa Heart Institute about her research, which has demonstrated why Nordic walking is one of the best forms of exercise for improving your heart health. Our volunteer Jessica picks up some poles and transforms her regular walks into a full-body workout. Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small Editor: Zoë Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 2 May 2024

Try Flax Seeds

Michael Mosley gets his flax fix, as he finds out how flax seeds, also known as linseeds, can protect your heart, reduce your blood sugar levels, and might even keep your skin feeling smooth and hydrated! With the help of Dr Grant Pierce from the University of Manitoba in Canada, Michael learns about the key components of flaxseed, including alpha-linolenic acid, and how they contribute to its array of impressive benefits. Through his research, Grant has demonstrated that daily flaxseed can lower your blood pressure and cholesterol, reducing your chance of a heart attack or stroke by a remarkable 50%! Meanwhile, our volunteer Rena finds flaxseed a welcome addition to her diet. Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small Editor: Zoë Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 25 April 2024

Play an Instrument

Humans have been making music for thousands of years, but for Michael Mosley and our volunteer Matthew, the musical journey is only just beginning. Playing a musical instrument has been shown to strengthen your memory and lift your mood. It can even reduce chronic inflammation. Dr Sofia Seinfeld from the Open University in Catalonia tells Michael why it’s never too late to start making music, and how it can enhance your cognitive abilities by activating regions of the brain associated with motor co-ordination and the processing of emotions. Meanwhile, Matthew gets to grips with the ukulele to see if he can master a tune and boost his wellbeing. Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small Editor: Zoë Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 18 April 2024

Enjoy Olive Oil

Michael Mosley discovers that enjoying more olive oil in your daily diet can come with a whole host of surprising benefits, including protecting your brain, improving your memory and reducing chronic inflammation. The Mediterranean diet has been shown to be one of the healthiest in the world, and a major component of this is olive oil. Dr Bill Mullen from the University of Glasgow tells Michael about his recent research, which found that two tablespoons of olive oil a day can significantly reduce biological markers of heart disease. Meanwhile our volunteer Ellen, an avid home cook, reaps the benefits of switching to olive oil. Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small Editor: Zoë Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 11 April 2024

Get Fit with HIIT

There’s no question that exercise is important for our health, but many of us find it difficult to fit into our busy schedules. In this episode, Michael Mosley explores how high-intensity interval training, HIIT for short, might be the most time-efficient way to get fitter. It can also boost your cognitive performance, help you live longer, and improve your quality of life. Martin Gibala, Professor of Kinesiology at McMaster University in Ontario, reveals all about the beneficial impact of HIIT on your cardiorespiratory system, your ability to control your blood sugar levels, and your risk of chronic diseases. Meanwhile, busy mum and NHS worker Suzanne finds HIIT a great way to incorporate a workout into her hectic routine.Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small Editor: Zoë Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 4 April 2024

Announcing Series 7 of Just One Thing

Dr Michael Mosley looks ahead to his new series which starts on Thursday 4 April, 2024. He'll be revealing more surprisingly simple and scientifically proven ways to improve your health and wellbeing.New episodes will be released on Thursdays. If you’re in the UK, listen to new episodes, a week early, first on BBC Sounds: bbc.in/3zqa6BB

Transcribed - Published: 28 March 2024

Get Gardening

Michael dons some gardening gloves and gets grubby. It’s no surprise that digging, hoeing and heaving bags of soil around is great for our physical fitness. But Michael learns how gardening can also impact our microbiome from Dr Hannah Holscher at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. She explores how gardening can boost the gut microbiome, benefitting our health and wellness. Our volunteer Caspar, tests his green fingers by growing some kitchen herbs and visiting a community garden.Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small Science Producer: Catherine Wyler Researcher: Sophie Richardson Researcher: Will Hornbrook Production Manager: Maria Simons Editor: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 13 March 2024

Get Skipping

It’s time to dig out that skipping rope, as Michael learns that the popular childhood pastime could have big benefits for health and wellbeing, especially as we get older. Professor Urs Granacher from the University of Freiburg, shares how skipping is a form of jumping exercise, which could help increase not just our speed, but could also help us age healthily. These exercises help increase muscle power and can also strengthen our bones. Our volunteer Shona, a new mum based in Shetland, uses skipping as an excuse to get outside. Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small Science Producer: Catherine Wyler Researcher: Sophie Richardson Researcher: Will Hornbrook Production Manager: Maria Simons Editor: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 6 March 2024

Snack Smartly

We are a nation of snackers and we tend to get a whopping 25% of our daily calories from our snacks. But surprisingly, snacking isn’t necessarily bad for our health. Dr Sarah Berry at Kings College London explores a pragmatic approach to snacking, and tells Michael how what you snack on and when you snack has the greatest impact on your health. You don’t have to stop snacking - just snack smartly by swapping in some less-processed options. Our volunteer Denise, a hotel facilities manager from Liverpool, tries to reap the benefits of better snacks.Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small Science Producer: Catherine Wyler Researcher: Sophie Richardson Researcher: Will Hornbrook Production Manager: Maria Simons Editor: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 28 February 2024

Track Your Exercise

Tracking your exercise is a simple and surprisingly effective way to motivate you to move more. Most of us own an exercise tracker, whether it’s the fitness app on our phone or a special bit of kit on our wrist. But how do they make us more active? Professor Carol Maher, from the University of Southern Australia, has found wearing an activity tracker really can encourage more physical activity. She tells Michael how the instant feedback allows people to take control of their activity levels. Michael learns the extra movement a tracker encourages can really help improve your brain power and reduce your risk of certain cancers and type 2 diabetes. Volunteer Rumbi opens her fitness app and steps out to see if it really works.Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small Science Producer: Catherine Wyler Researcher: Sophie Richardson Researcher: Will Hornbrook Production Manager: Maria Simons Editor: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 21 February 2024

Get an Early Night

Michael discovers his long-time penchant for an early night could have some real health benefits. If you are someone who could go to sleep earlier and simply put it off with an extra episode or phone scrolling, Michael recommends going to bed an hour earlier than normal because getting enough sleep deeply impacts your brain, protecting against depression and other neurological problems. Professor Esra Tasali at the University of Chicago's Sleep Centre, shares her research that sleeping an extra hour a night has been found to have an incredible effect on our appetite, reducing cravings often linked to weight gain. Our volunteer Dylan, who is very health and exercise conscious, is surprised to find a little more sleep every night could benefit his fitness routine.Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small Science Producer: Catherine Wyler Researcher: Sophie Richardson Researcher: Will Hornbrook Production Manager: Maria Simons Editor: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 14 February 2024

Eat Whole Grains

Michael discovers incorporating wholegrains into our diet, is a tasty swap that could really benefit our health. Wholegrains such as wholegrain pasta, bread and brown rice contain more fibre, vitamins and minerals, than refined grains. This simple swap can help reduce blood pressure, improve heart health and boost the gut microbiome. Michael talks to Dr Caleigh Sawicki, from the Brigham and Women’s hospital and Harvard Medical School, whose research suggests that the fibre consumption of wholegrains can keep us fuller for longer and this slow digestion could result in a lower increase in blood sugar. Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small Science Producer: Catherine Wyler Researcher: Sophie Richardson Researcher: Will Hornbrook Production Manager: Maria Simons Editor: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 7 February 2024

Do a Plank

Michael adds a plank into his exercise routine and is surprised to learn of its huge benefits to our physical health.Dr Jamie O'Driscoll, a Reader of Cardiovascular Physiology at Canterbury Christ Church University, reveals how the plank is a form of isometric exercise, where muscles are held still, neither stretching nor contracting. Jamie shares his research that found these exercises, including the plank and the wall-squat, could massively reduce our blood pressure.Michael also explores how the plank can even be better than crunches or sit ups for your abs and core muscles. Our volunteer Penelope takes on the plank, excited to learn that this small addition to her fitness regime could yield great results. Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small Science Producer: Catherine Wyler Researcher: Sophie Richardson Researcher: Will Hornbrook Production Manager: Maria Simons Editor: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 31 January 2024

Drink Green Tea

Michael takes a break to brew up a cup of green tea, warming up to its distinctive taste and its health benefits. Dr Edward Okello, from the Human Nutrition Research Centre at the University of Newcastle, reveals how green tea can benefit our brain power and health. Green tea contains the polyphenol EGCG (Epigallocatechin Gallate) and Professor Okello explains how this polyphenol inhibits a destructive enzyme which harms our brain cells. Michael also learns that a nice hot cup of green tea also induces calming brain waves, improves heart health and could even help delay dementia. Meanwhile, volunteer Jacqui enjoys the benefits of going green.Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small Science Producer: Catherine Wyler Researcher: Sophie Richardson Researcher: Will Hornbrook Production Manager: Maria Simons Editor: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 24 January 2024

Take Vitamin D

During the winter months, here in the UK, days are short and there isn’t enough sunlight for most of us to make the vitamin D we need. Taking a tiny vitamin D supplement is a minute change that could have a huge impact on our health. Professor David Llewellyn from Exeter University explains to Michael that vitamin D helps clear abnormal proteins, such as amyloid plaques and tau, from the brain, which may help protect you from dementia. Having enough vitamin D can also boost your immune systems, making that common cold easier to recover from. It could even lift your mood! Volunteer Baljit tries making vitamin D a habit.Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small Science Producer: Catherine Wyler Researcher: Sophie Richardson Researcher: Will Hornbrook Production Manager: Maria Simons Editor: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 17 January 2024

Be Kind

We could all use a little kindness in our lives. Surprisingly, a little altruism can actually have big benefits for our own health! Michael discovers that small acts of kindness can not only boost your mental health and improve your relationships but also boost the immune system. Dr Tristan Inagaki from the San Diego State University explains to Michael how her research has revealed that those performing acts of kindness had lower levels of systemic inflammation, which could reduce the risk of many major diseases. Meanwhile, our volunteer Sam enjoys finding ways to consciously incorporate kindness into his week.Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small Science Producer: Catherine Wyler Researcher: Sophie Richardson Researcher: Will Hornbrook Production Manager: Maria Simons Editor: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 10 January 2024

Inflammation Special – with Prof Janet Lord

In this series of special editions of BBC Radio 4 podcast Just One Thing, Michael Mosley quizzes the world’s leading health experts on the best ways to live well. In this Inflammation Special, we hear from Janet Lord, who is Professor of Immune Cell Biology at the Institute for Inflammation and Ageing at Birmingham University.We hear the top tips that Professor Lord swears by to reduce the damaging effects of inflammation on our body. How can simply moving your muscles make anti-inflammatory chemicals? Why could how much you eat be important? And what should you be eating to help reduce inflammation? And as this is a Just One Thing special, we'll end each interview by asking Professor Lord for the one single-most effective health hack to reduce inflammation.Producer: Dom Byrne Production Manager: Maria Simons Exec Producer: Zoe Heron Specially composed music by Richard Atkinson (Mcasso) A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 6 January 2024

Weight Loss Special – with Prof Giles Yeo

In this series of special editions of BBC Radio 4 podcast Just One Thing, Michael Mosley quizzes the world’s leading health experts on the best ways to live well. In this Weight Loss Special, we hear from Professor Giles Yeo, a leading expert in the genetics of obesity at the University of Cambridge. We hear the top tips Professor Yeo swears by to help you shed the pounds. What’s the best way to lose weight? What should you be eating and how should you be exercising? And what’s the best way to keep it off? And as this is a Just One Thing special, we'll end each interview by asking Professor Yeo for the one single most effective health hack to shift a few pounds.Producer: Dom Byrne Production Manager: Maria Simons Exec Producer: Zoe Heron Specially composed music by Richard Atkinson (Mcasso) A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 4 January 2024

Stay Young Special – with Prof Andrew Steptoe

In this series of special editions of BBC Radio 4 podcast Just One Thing, Michael Mosley quizzes the world’s leading health experts on the best ways to live well. In this Stay Young Special, we hear from Professor Andrew Steptoe, Head of Behavioural Science and Health at University College London, who leads the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA). We hear the top tips that Professor Steptoe swears by to keep youthful. How can having a sense of purpose keep you genetically young? Why can feeling younger make you physically youthful? And how can your social life keep you in your prime? And as this is a Just One Thing special, we'll end each interview by asking Professor Steptoe for the one single most effective health hack to help you stay young.Producer: Dom Byrne Production Manager: Maria Simons Exec Producer: Zoe Heron Specially composed music by Richard Atkinson (Mcasso) A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 2 January 2024

Exercise Special – with Prof Marie Murphy

In this series of special editions of BBC Radio 4 podcast Just One Thing, Michael Mosley quizzes the world’s leading health experts on the best ways to live well. In this Exercise Special, we hear from Marie Murphy – Professor of Exercise and Health at Ulster University and leading expert in physical fitness and lead scientist advising on the UK physical activity guidelines.We hear the top tips that Professor Murphy swears by to get maximum fitness for minimum effort. Could exercising in short bouts be better for you? Why should we all be building muscle over 30? And could the way you walk change your life? And as this is a Just One Thing special, Michael ends the interview by asking Professor Murphy for the single most effective health hack for keeping in shape.Series Producer: Dom Byrne Production Manager: Maria Simons Exec Producer: Zoe Heron Specially composed music by Richard Atkinson (Mcasso) A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 27 December 2023

Sleep Special – with Prof Russell Foster

In this series of special editions of BBC Radio 4 podcast Just One Thing, Michael Mosley quizzes the world’s leading health experts on the best ways to live well. In this Sleep Special, we hear from Professor Russell Foster - Director of the Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute at the University of Oxford and one of the world’s leading researchers on what makes our body clocks tick. We hear the top tips that Professor Foster lives by to improve the way we sleep and live. How many hours do we really need to ensure a refreshing slumber? What is our chronotype and can we adapt it? And what are the dos and don’ts of sleep hygiene that we should all follow? And as this is a Just One Thing special, we'll end each interview by asking Professor Foster for the one single most effective health hack to get a good night’s rest.Producer: Dom Byrne Production Manager: Maria Simons Editor: Zoe Heron Specially composed music by Richard Atkinson (Mcasso) A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 20 December 2023

Happiness Special – with Dr Rangan Chatterjee

In this series of special editions of BBC Radio 4 podcast Just One Thing, Michael Mosley quizzes the world’s leading health experts on the best ways to live well. In this Happiness Special we hear from Dr Rangan Chatterjee - GP, host of successful podcast “Feel Better, Live More” and author of numerous best-selling books including “Happy Mind, Happy Life”. We hear the top tips that Dr Chatterjee swears by to improve and maintain good mental health and wellbeing. Could talking to strangers make you more content? Would eliminating choice reduce stress and improve your wellbeing? Is changing your relationship with technology the key to improving your life? And as this is a Just One Thing special, Michael ends the interview by asking Dr Chatterjee for his single most effective health hack for a happier life.Series Producer: Dom Byrne Production Manager: Maria Simons Exec Producer: Zoe Heron Specially composed music by Richard Atkinson (Mcasso) A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 13 December 2023

Cold Therapy - Ep 5: Sleep and the Cold

There’s a chill in the air as the winter months come around again. But the cold isn’t always something to fight or guard against. With a little bit of care, you can invite the cold into your life - with real benefits for health and mood. In each episode of this new podcast series, Dr Michael Mosley uncovers the science behind a different way you can harness the power of the cold, alongside the very latest research and atmospheric sound design.In this final episode, how keeping a colder bedroom can lead to better, deeper sleep - and how our sleep is affected by the changing climate.Guests: Kathryn Reid, research professor, Centre for Circadian and Sleep Medicine at Northwestern University, Illinois. Dr. Nick Obradovich, Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, OklahomaSeries Producer, Sound Designer and Mix Engineer: Richard Ward Researcher: William Hornbrook Science Producer: Samantha Lewis Production Manager: Maria Simons Editor: Zoe Heron Specially composed music by Richard Atkinson (Mcasso) A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio

Transcribed - Published: 3 December 2023

Cold Therapy - Ep 4: Cold Water Swim

There’s a chill in the air as the winter months come around again. But the cold isn’t always something to fight or guard against. With a little bit of care, you can invite the cold into your life - with real benefits for health and mood. In each episode of this new podcast series, Dr Michael Mosley uncovers the science behind a different way you can harness the power of the cold, alongside the very latest research and atmospheric sound design.In this episode, how cold water swimming can increase energy levels, boost your mood, reduce inflammation and might even improve your brain health.Guests: Professor Giovanna Mallucci, Altos Labs Dr Heather Massey, Portsmouth UniversitySeries Producer, Sound Designer and Mix Engineer: Richard Ward Researcher: William Hornbrook Science Producer: Samantha Lewis Production Manager: Maria Simons Editor: Zoe Heron Specially composed music by Richard Atkinson (Mcasso) A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 2 December 2023

Cold Therapy - Ep 3: Cold Exercise

There’s a chill in the air as the winter months come around again. But the cold isn’t always something to fight or guard against. With a little bit of care, you can invite the cold into your life - with real benefits for health and mood. In each episode of this new podcast series, Dr Michael Mosley uncovers the science behind a different way you can harness the power of the cold, alongside the very latest research and atmospheric sound design.In this episode, Michael goes for a jog on a chilly day, and finds out how exercising in colder weather can allow you to go further than on a hot day, enabling you to work harder, for longer, with less effort.Guests: Dr Chris Tyler, University of Roehampton Hannah Pallubinsky, Assistant Professor at Maastricht University.Series Producer, Sound Designer and Mix Engineer: Richard Ward Researcher: William Hornbrook Science Producer: Samantha Lewis Production Manager: Maria Simons Editor: Zoe Heron Specially composed music by Richard Atkinson (Mcasso) A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 1 December 2023

Cold Therapy - Ep 2: Cold Recovery

There’s a chill in the air as the winter months come around again. But the cold isn’t always something to fight or guard against. With a little bit of care, you can invite the cold into your life - with real benefits for health and mood. In each episode of this new podcast series, Dr Michael Mosley uncovers the science behind a different way you can harness the power of the cold, alongside the very latest research and atmospheric sound design.In this episode, how and when to ice an injury, and why taking contrast showers (alternating between hot and cold) can aid your recovery, reduce pain, improve energy levels and even help you take less sick days.Guest: Dr Amir Pakravan, consultant in sport, exercise and musculoskeletal medicine.Series Producer, Sound Designer and Mix Engineer: Richard Ward Researcher: William Hornbrook Science Producer: Samantha Lewis Production Manager: Maria Simons Editor: Zoe Heron Specially composed music by Richard Atkinson (Mcasso) A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 30 November 2023

Cold Therapy - Ep 1: Colder Room

There’s a chill in the air as the winter months come around again. But the cold isn’t always something to fight or guard against. With a little bit of care, you can invite the cold into your life - with real benefits for health and mood. In each episode of this new podcast series, Dr Michael Mosley uncovers the science behind a different way you can harness the power of the cold, alongside the very latest research and atmospheric sound design.In this first episode, how turning your thermostat down by just a few degrees can improve your fat and blood sugar metabolism, boost your mood, and might even protect against type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.Guest: Hannah Pallubinsky, Assistant Professor at Maastricht University.Series Producer, Sound Designer and Mix Engineer: Richard Ward Researcher: William Hornbrook Science Producer: Samantha Lewis Production Manager: Maria Simons Editor: Zoe Heron Specially composed music by Richard Atkinson (Mcasso) A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 29 November 2023

Welcome to Cold Therapy - with Michael Mosley

There’s a chill in the air as Dr Michael Mosley uncovers the surprising power of the cold to enhance your health and wellbeing in ways you might not expect.

Transcribed - Published: 24 November 2023

Listen to Music

Bring on the tunes! In this episode, Michael explores the power of music, from reducing pain to forging strong family relationships. Neuroscientist Dr Psyche Loui from Northeastern University in Boston reveals how just eight weeks of music listening can change activity in the brain, impacting our reward centres in our brain, and why this could be important for healthy ageing. Our volunteer Roberta has a go at “mindful” music listening with an eclectic range of music from Bollywood music to opera. New episodes will be released on Wednesdays, but if you’re in the UK, listen to new episodes, a week early, first on BBC Sounds: bbc.in/3zqa6BBProducer: Nija Dalal-Small Science Producer: Catherine Wyler Assistant Producer: Gulnar Mimaroglu Trainee Assistant Producer: Toni Arenyeka Executive Producer: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 22 November 2023

Walk Backwards

Step out - backwards! The Chinese have a saying that 100 steps backwards are worth 1000 steps forward - and they might be onto something! It may look bizarre to onlookers, but Michael delves into the research and finds some surprising benefits. It’s been used for decades in rehabilitative physical therapy, and recent research reveals that it could even boost memory - by giving your brain a workout! Michael also speaks to biomechanics expert and champion of backwards walking, Professor Janet Dufek from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, whose research suggests that walking backwards could help with lower back pain. They discuss why walking backwards is so beneficial for our muscles and how to do it safely. Volunteer Nina takes her daughter with her for a backward stroll - and gets a laugh out of it!New episodes will be released on Wednesdays, but if you’re in the UK, listen to new episodes, a week early, first on BBC Sounds: bbc.in/3zqa6BBProducer: Nija Dalal-Small Science Producer: Catherine Wyler Assistant Producer: Gulnar Mimaroglu Trainee Assistant Producer: Toni Arenyeka Executive Producer: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 15 November 2023

Have a Laugh

Laughter really is good medicine. From releasing pain-killing endorphins to improving your memory, laughter can have many benefits on your body and brain - it’s even been shown to boost “gamma” brainwaves, which are associated with higher level brain processes, like learning and memory. In this episode, Michael shares a chuckle with cardiologist Professor Michael Miller from the University of Pennsylvania in the US to discuss how laughter can help your heart health, keep your blood vessels young, and be the antidote to stress. Meanwhile, our volunteer Manpreet enjoys the benefits of a glorious cackle. New episodes will be released on Wednesdays, but if you’re in the UK, listen to new episodes, a week early, first on BBC Sounds: bbc.in/3zqa6BBProducer: Nija Dalal-Small Science Producer: Catherine Wyler Assistant Producer: Gulnar Mimaroglu Trainee Assistant Producer: Toni Arenyeka Executive Producer: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 8 November 2023

Embrace the Rain

Get that brolly out! It may feel deeply counter-intuitive - but rainy days could offer a host of health and mood-lifting benefits. Rain improves air quality, literally washing fine particulate pollution away, and rainfall also releases Geosmin, a fragrant compound which is linked with relaxation and increased serotonin levels. What’s more, Professor Michael Terman, from Columbia University in New York, introduces Michael to negative air ions created after rainfall. He is researching how high levels of negative ions could potentially reduce stress, stave off depression and maybe even boost your immune system. Meanwhile, our volunteer Dennis steps outside and embraces the rain. New episodes will be released on Wednesdays, but if you’re in the UK, listen to new episodes, a week early, first on BBC Sounds: bbc.in/3zqa6BBProducer: Nija Dalal-Small Science Producer: Catherine Wyler Assistant Producer: Gulnar Mimaroglu Trainee Assistant Producer: Toni Arenyeka Executive Producer:: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 1 November 2023

Reheat Pasta

Load up on those leftovers - because it’s surprisingly easy to make your bowl of pasta better for you! In this episode, Michael uncovers how reheating carb-heavy foods actually boosts the resistant starch in them. Resistant starch is a healthy carb that can benefit your gut, reduce blood sugar spikes and lower your cancer risk. Dr Darrell Cockburn, Assistant Professor of Food Science from Penn State University, reveals how these carbs can benefit your microbiome. They discuss why reheating leftovers can not only reduce food waste, but also make your food more nutritious than the original dish!New episodes will be released on Wednesdays, but if you’re in the UK, listen to new episodes, a week early, first on BBC Sounds: bbc.in/3zqa6BBProducer: Nija Dalal-Small Science Producer: Catherine Wyler Assistant Producer: Gulnar Mimaroglu Trainee Assistant Producer: Toni Arenyeka Executive Producer: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 25 October 2023

Practise Pilates

It’s a low-impact, low-intensity exercise that can make you stronger, more flexible, and benefit your posture and balance. It’s proven to reduce lower back pain and it can even enhance your exercise performance! No surprise that tennis star Andy Murray uses it in his training routine. In this episode, Pilates expert Professor Ruth Melo from the University of San Paulo reveals all about the benefits of Pilates on our cardiovascular endurance, core strength and healthy ageing. Meanwhile, Michael challenges keen tennis player Rambali to take up Pilates and see if he can improve his serve. New episodes will be released on Wednesdays, but if you’re in the UK, listen to new episodes, a week early, first on BBC Sounds: bbc.in/3zqa6BBProducer: Nija Dalal-Small Science Producer: Catherine Wyler Assistant Producer: Gulnar Mimaroglu Trainee Assistant Producer: Toni Arenyeka Executive Producer:: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 18 October 2023

Breathe Through Your Nose

Take a nice deep breath in… through your nose. It’s a simple way to get healthier gums, a better memory, and improved lung function. How? Well, it may partly be due to a special molecule called nitric oxide. Michael Mosley speaks to Professor Jon Lundberg from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden who made the fascinating discovery that nitric oxide is produced in your nose and travels to your lungs where it has some surprising benefits, including boosting oxygen uptake and possibly helping you fight off infections. Our volunteer Joe tries out a few tips to make nasal breathing a habit.New episodes will be released on Wednesdays, but if you’re in the UK, listen to new episodes, a week early, first on BBC Sounds: bbc.in/3zqa6BBProducer: Nija Dalal-Small Science Producer: Catherine Wyler Assistant Producer: Gulnar Mimaroglu Trainee Assistant Producer: Toni Arenyeka Executive Producer: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 11 October 2023

Cook Tomatoes

Tomatoes are packed full of goodness & cooked tomatoes are even better for you! In this episode, Michael reveals how cooking your tomatoes - sautéed, or in a sauce or soup - can reduce your blood fat levels, help your body recover from exercise, and even protect your skin from damage. It’s all to do with a beneficial compound called lycopene which is released under heat. Michael speaks to Professor Richard van Breemen from Oregon State University who reveals his studies on lycopene and why cooked tomatoes can help protect against prostate cancer.New episodes will be released on Wednesdays, but if you’re in the UK, listen to new episodes, a week early, first on BBC Sounds: bbc.in/3zqa6BBProducer: Nija Dalal-Small Science Producer: Catherine Wyler Assistant Producer: Gulnar Mimaroglu Trainee Assistant Producer: Toni Arenyeka Executive Producer: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 4 October 2023

Swim

Michael Mosley ventures to his local pool and the sea to explore the unique benefits of going for a swim - from improving memory and mental agility, to boosting longevity. Professor Hirofumi Tanaka, from the University of Texas at Austin, reveals why water-based exercises like swimming are especially good for improving the elasticity of your blood vessels and a new way to exercise in the pool. There really seems to be something special about being in the water that can help your heart, improve joint pain and even boost your brain. Surprisingly, water-based exercise can be more beneficial than land-based exercises!New episodes will be released on Wednesdays, but if you’re in the UK, listen to new episodes, a week early, first on BBC Sounds: bbc.in/3zqa6BBProducer: Nija Dalal-Small Science Producer: Catherine Wyler Assistant Producer: Gulnar Mimaroglu Trainee Assistant Producer: Toni Arenyeka Executive Producer: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 27 September 2023

Have a Cup of Tea

Michael gets cosy with a cuppa to find out how drinking tea can boost your heart health, reduce stress and may even benefit your bones! With the help of Professor Andrew Steptoe, Head of Behavioural Science at University College London, Michael learns the surprising benefits of ordinary tea. They discuss the benefits of bioactive compounds in tea, including L-theanine and polyphenols. A tasty brew can not only help you recover from stress, it can even benefit your heart health and reduce inflammation…Meanwhile, our volunteer Kit enjoys adding more tea to her life.New episodes will be released on Wednesdays, but if you’re in the UK, listen to new episodes, a week early, first on BBC Sounds: bbc.in/3zqa6BBProducer: Nija Dalal-Small Science Producer: Catherine Wyler Assistant Producer: Gulnar Mimaroglu Trainee Assistant Producer: Toni Arenyeka Executive Producer: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 20 September 2023

Stay Young - Ep 5: Stay Strong

Michael explores the best way to help you look younger as well as live longer and healthier – revealing how strength training can benefit your waistline, preserve muscle fibres and increase healthy lifespan.Pumping up your muscles is one of the best ways to protect from the ravages of time and injury. In this episode, Michael speaks to Professor Abigail Mackey from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, to find out how resistance training can strengthen the connection between your brain and muscles, and keep them looking younger at the cellular level. And it’s not just your muscles that benefit, maintaining your muscle mass can boost your brain function, improve sleep, and significantly reduce your risk of diabetes. It may even be better at reducing belly fat than cardio! Champion weight-lifter Shirley Webb reveals how lifting weights transformed her life and mobility even though she only started pumping irons in her mid-70s. Producer: Catherine Wyler Assistant Producer: Gulnar Mimaroglu Executive Producer: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4

Transcribed - Published: 14 July 2023

Stay Young - Ep 4: Stay Feeling Good

Michael reveals the best food to boost your mood, your energy levels, reduce inflammation and improve your immune system. In this episode, Michael discovers the benefits of fermented foods and their live bacteria. He speaks to Professor Justin Sonnenburg from Stanford University who’s recent clinical trial revealed that eating fermented foods can increase your gut microbiome diversity and reduce inflammation, one of the main drivers of ageing. They discuss the role of your gut bacteria in increasing the activity of key immune cells with knock-on effects across the body, and why a healthy gut microbiome is so important for feeling good. 63 year-old Donna Schwenk from California reveals how discovering fermented foods has transformed her life and given her the energy of someone decades younger. Producer: Catherine Wyler Assistant Producer: Gulnar Mimaroglu Executive Producer: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 13 July 2023

Stay Young - Ep 3: Stay Sharp

Want to get the mental sharpness of someone decades younger? Challenging your brain with something difficult, like learning a new language or taking up juggling, can trigger your brain to form new connections, increasing your brain’s white matter and making it more resilient against age-related decline. In this episode, Michael speaks to Dr Rachel Wu from the University of California Riverside who has discovered that learning three new skills at the same time can significantly boost the memory in older adults - so much so that they performed as well as someone 50 years younger in a series of cognitive tests. Superager Lord Richard Wilson shares his top tips for a sharper mind and the role of grit, determination, and insatiable curiosity. Producer: Catherine Wyler Assistant Producer: Gulnar Mimaroglu Executive Producer: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 12 July 2023

Stay Young - Ep 2: Stay Looking Young

How a simply dietary change can reduce wrinkles, improve skin texture and slow ageing. In this episode Michael reveals how a daily portion of colourful fruit and vegetables can help retain skin moisture and boost collagen. Carotenoids are compounds that give carrots, mangoes and tomatoes their bright red and orange colour – and they have been shown to boost your skin’s collagen and moisture, improving wrinkles, skin plumpness and texture. He speaks to dermatologist Dr Raja Sivamani from the University of California, Davis, whose research shows that eating a daily portion of mango could help reverse existing wrinkles and prevent new ones from forming. And we meet 81-year-old Annette Larkins from Florida who explains why she thinks her youthful looks are thanks to her diet consisting mainly of fruits and vegetables.Producer: Catherine Wyler Assistant Producer: Gulnar Mimaroglu Executive Producer: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 11 July 2023

Stay Young - Ep 1: Stay Fit

Exercise is one of the best things you can do to rejuvenate yourself at the cellular level – but what’s the best way to do it? In this episode, Michael speaks to Associate Professor Matt Robinson from Oregon State University, who has discovered that just a few minutes of high-intensity exercise can help rejuvenate you at the cellular level, by helping restore your mitochondria, your cell’s energy powerhouses. They discuss how exercise has many benefits across your body - from your muscles, to your heart, your brain and even your skin! And we meet octogenarian and healthy ageing expert Dr Norman Lazarus, who didn’t start exercising until his fifties, and now cycles 100km a week, feeling at his prime.Producer: Catherine Wyler Assistant Producer: Gulnar Mimaroglu Executive Producer: Zoe Heron A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

Transcribed - Published: 10 July 2023

Disclaimer: The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from BBC, and are the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Tapesearch.

Copyright © Tapesearch 2024.