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Drilled

Critical Frequency

True Crime, Science, Social Sciences, Earth Sciences

4.82.3K Ratings

Overview

A true-crime podcast about climate change. Hosted by award-winning investigative journalist Amy Westervelt and reported by a team of climate journalists, Drilled investigates the various obstacles that have kept the world from adequately responding to climate change.

221 Episodes

The Coordinated Attack on Shareholder Activism

The backlash against ESG is continuing, with a string of lawsuits aimed at shutting down shareholder activism. We don't often talk about shareholder activism in the vein of protecting protest, but it's absolutely part of the story. Andrew Behar, CEO of shareholder advocacy group As You Sow, joins us to explain what's going on, and why anyone who cares about basic rights needs to be tuning into the ESG fight. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 18 May 2024

Climate News Update: The New Carbon Majors + Swiss Elders Win Landmark Climate Case

Lots of news lately on stories we've been following, so in today's episode: an update! The landmark Carbon Majors report has been updated with some surprising new data, and the European Court of Human Rights has sent down an historic ruling that will shape how EU legislators look at energy and climate. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 13 April 2024

Sainte-Soline, the Government Effort to Disband a Movement in France, and the Radical Solidarity of the Earth Uprising

In France, the unthinkable has happened for polluting industries: the working-class Yellow Vest movement, racial equity movements, and progressive climate activists have joined forces in a multi-racial, cross-class coalition called Earth Uprisings. The response has been shockingly violent and extreme. Reporter Anna Pujol-Mazzini takes us there. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 3 April 2024

Sainte-Soline, the Government Effort to Disband a Movement in France, and the Radical Solidarity of the Earth Uprisings

In France, the unthinkable has happened for polluting industries: the working-class Yellow Vest movement, racial equity movements, and progressive climate activists have joined forces in a multi-racial, cross-class coalition called Earth Uprisings. The response has been shockingly violent and extreme. Reporter Anna Pujol-Mazzini takes us there. Check out Fatima Ouassak's new book Pour Une Écologie Pirate Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 3 April 2024

The U.S. Anti-Renewables Movement, Explained

Late last year, Brown University's Climate and Development Lab put out a comprehensive report looking at the opposition to wind energy on the east coast of the U.S., called "Against the Wind." Today, the lead author of that report, Isaac Slevin, walks us through what's real and what's manufactured in this opposition, which has not only continued to grow in the U.S. but now influenced a similar movement in Australia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 20 March 2024

Slow Factory's Céline Semaan on Climate Justice, Collective Liberation, and Building an Unbreakable Movement

When Céline Semaan began calling for a ceasefire in Gaza, she was surprised at the backlash she and her team at Slow Factory got, including multiple funders pulling their support. Today, Semaan is more determined than ever to push for climate justice and collective liberation. Pre-order A Woman Is a School: https://shop.slowfactory.earth/products/a-woman-is-a-school Check out course(s) on Open Edu: https://slowfactory.earth/open-edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 12 March 2024

Nearly 30 Years After the Ogoni 9 Tragedy, Nigerians Are Still Resisting Oil Colonialism

Shell announced in late 2023 that it would be shutting down all of its onshore activities in Nigeria and concentrating its efforts offshore. It leaves behind poisoned water, multiple political and economic crises, and a country that is measurably worse off today than when its oil industry began. Meanwhile the government continues to target environmental activists. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 5 March 2024

Messy Conversations: How to Talk to Kids about Climate Change, with Mary Annaïse Heglar — a Mini Hot Take Reunion!

Mary Annaïse Heglar's first book is out today, The World Is Ours to Cherish— children's book about climate change. It's the first of *three* climate books Mary has coming out in the near future (the other two are a novel, called Troubled Waters, and an essay collection of Black writers on climate). She has been busy writing up a storm since we wrapped up Hot Take (and we've roped her into editing stories for Drilled, too). In this episode we talk about her books, what's happening in climate media in general, and the question Amy gets asked all the time and can't answer very well: How do you talk to kids about climate change. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 27 February 2024

What Ecuador's Yasuní Referendum Really Means for Oil, in Yasuní and Beyond

Last year, headlines all over the world proclaimed victory for the environment: finally, after more than a decade of promises, there would be no more drilling in Yasuní National Park, a large swath of the Ecuadorian Amazon. But as Macy Lipkin reports, all wasn't what it seemed. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 20 February 2024

Introducing: Hazard NYC

Check out the limited-run series Hazard NYC from The City, all about how climate change intersects with Superfund sites in New York City. Start with episode one here: https://www.thecity.nyc/2024/02/14/newtown-creek-superfund-pollution-hazardnyc-faqnyc-podcast/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 19 February 2024

Dana R. Fisher on the Past, Present and Future of Climate Protest

In her new book Saving Ourselves, Dana R. Fisher compiles years worth of research on protest in general and climate protest in particular for a comprehensive look at tactics, what "works," what a protest "working" even means, where the movement is likely to go next and where it needs to go to achieve real climate action. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 13 February 2024

Messy Conversations: Rhiana Gunn-Wright on What the Climate Movement Loses When It Excludes Environmental Justice

Rhiana Gunn-Wright was one of the architects of the Green New Deal, and today works as the climate policy director for the Roosevelt Institute. In this episode we get into the nuances of the IRA, how to handle climate being a "culture war" issue, what's going on with anti-renewables, and what the climate movement loses when it turns its back on justice issues and particularly when it turns its back on the Black community. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 6 February 2024

Department of Homeland Security, the Manufactured "EcoTerrorist" Panic, and Cop City

The U.S. government's definition of what constitutes an "ecoterrorist" has long driven backlash against environmental activists and in recent years that definition has only broadened. Investigative reporter and Drilled senior editor Alleen Brown dug into this recently and found that the Department of Homeland Security had been warning officials in Atlanta about the threat posed by "Defend the Atlanta Forest" for months before police raided the forest, ultimately killing one protestor, and charging dozens more with domestic terrorism and racketeering. It was such an overreaction that even mainstream media covered it. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 31 January 2024

Meet the UN's First Special Rapporteur on Environmental Defenders

In June 2022, Michel Forst became the first UN Special Rapporteur on Environmental Defenders. In that role he has spent the past year visiting various countries and speaking out about the increasingly onerous laws and aggressive tactics being used against climate protestors. Today he released a statement on the UK, saying he is "extremely worried" about "the increasingly severe crackdowns on environmental defenders in the United Kingdom, including in relation to the exercise of the right to peaceful protest." In this episode, our France reporter Anna Pujol-Mazzini talks to Forst about his new position, what it means, and what power he has to do something about the creeping crackdown on climate protest. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 23 January 2024

How UK Courts Became the New Climate Protest Battleground

About a decade after UK courts made history with the first "climate necessity" ruling in history, the UK government has passed new laws that not only restrict what protesters can do, but also how protesters are allowed to defend themselves in court. Some judges don't apply the new laws so strictly, but others have held people in contempt for just trying to explain themselves. In some courtrooms, the climate necessity defense has been effectively outlawed. How did that happen? And how did it happen so quickly? That's our story today. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 16 January 2024

What Happened At Bayou Bridge? The Other End of the Dakota Access Pipeline

While protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline at the Standing Rock Sioux Indian Reservation garnered international news coverage, at the southern end of the pipeline, cops moonlighting as pipeline security were suppressing free speech with impunity. In this episode, reporter Karen Savage tells us what happened at Bayou Bridge, and what lessons the story holds for the climate movement and for anyone who believes in the importance of democracy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 19 December 2023

Seven Years Later, an Environmental Impact Statement for the Dakota Access Pipeline

This month, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers closes the comment period on its draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Dakota Access Pipeline, a 1,172-mile pipeline that’s been pumping 500,000 barrels of oil per day since May 2017. The pipeline runs from the Bakken oil fields in North Dakota to southern Illinois, crossing the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers. Over the past six years, every court in the country has ruled that the Army Corps of Engineers did not study the pipeline’s environmental impact closely enough before approving the pipeline’s route. The Standing Rock Sioux tribe has maintained all along that the project poses a serious threat to its drinking water. From April 2016 to February 2017 thousands of water protectors from all over the country (and beyond) joined them in protests and direct actions. The resistance at Standing Rock is often cited by the fossil fuel industry, police and politicians as the reason states need new anti-protest laws, while the backlash to that resistance is often cited by water protectors as the reason for PTSD, asthma, and in some cases lost eyes and limbs. Now, the Army Corps of Engineers says that removing the pipeline would be too damaging to the Missouri River and its surrounding ecosystems. The removal actions it describes in its EIS are the same actions taken to install the pipeline in the first place. The Army Corps suggests that removing the pipeline would be more environmentally harmful than allowing the oil to continue pumping under one of Standing Rock's primary drinking water sources. Nonetheless, this report—seven years late—represents one of the few pathways left to stop the pipeline. The Standing Rock Sioux tribe is advocating to seal the pipeline off, while some water protectors are advocating for the pipeline to be removed entirely. The public comment period closes Dec 13, 2023. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 7 December 2023

Weaponizing Uncertainty, with Vox's Unexplainable

With everyone arguing—again—about what science tells us the COP28 negotiations should be aiming for if we want to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, it's a great time to bring you this episode of Vox's Unexplainable, on which Drilled host, reporter Amy Westervelt, walks through how the fossil fuel industry weaponized the most fundamental aspect of scientific research: uncertainty. For show transcripts, go to bit.ly/unx-transcripts For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 6 December 2023

Modern-Day Bead Trading: The Fossil Fuel Industry Meets Indigenous Protest with "Redwashing" and Repression in Canada

As we resume our season focused on the global criminalization of climate protest, reporter Martha Troian brings us to Canada, where the Wet'suwet'en people have been fighting for years against a gas pipeline they never authorized on their territory. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 5 December 2023

Messy Conversations: Akshat Rathi on Climate Capitalism

Bloomberg's Akshat Rathi joins us to make the case that capitalism can be harnessed in service of addressing the climate crisis. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 22 November 2023

Abeer Butmeh: Living on the Front Lines of a War and the Climate Crisis, in Palestine

Abeer Butmeh, coordinator of the Palestinian NGOs Network, one of the most important Palestinian environmental organizations, spoke to senior editor Alleen Brown about battling for short-term and long-term survival when your identity itself is criminalized. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 14 November 2023

CBC Podcast Playlist: Straight to the Source

We're bringing you an episode of the CBC's Podcast Playlist today, featuring Drilled! In this episode, host Leah-Simone Brown talks to hosts of three shows (including this one) about why folks should listen to their show. Podcast Playlist is the longest-running podcast curation show, a great place to find your next favorite podcast. Check it out wherever you get your podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 7 November 2023

Messy Conversations: Magatte Wade, head of Atlas Network's Center for African Prosperity

We'll be back with the rest of our anti-protest season soon, but in the meantime, welcome to a new Drilled miniseries we're calling "Messy Conversations," getting into all the complicated nuance that unfortunately gets cut out of a lot of climate conversations. This week, Magatte Wade, who runs the Center for African Prosperity at the Atlas Network. She wasn't too happy with our recent coverage of Atlas, so we talked about that, the idea that solving poverty and addressing the climate crisis are mutually exclusive, where free speech ends and property rights begin for libertarians, and a whole lot more. Links: Alliance for Responsible Citizenship (ARC): https://www.arcforum.com/ DeSmog profile of ARC: https://www.desmog.com/alliance-for-responsible-citizenship-arc/ DeSmog coverage of ARC 2023 forum: https://www.desmog.com/2023/10/26/gop-climate-denier-vivek-ramaswamy-headlining-jordan-peterson-arc-conference/ Narasimha Rao's Decent Living Energy Project: https://www.decentlivingenergy.org/ Our Guyana season: https://drilled.media/podcasts/drilled#season-8 Center for African Prosperity: https://www.atlasnetwork.org/partners/center-for-african-prosperity Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 1 November 2023

Messy Conversations: Magatte Wade, Atlas Network's Center for African Prosperity

We'll be back with the rest of our anti-protest season soon, but in the meantime, welcome to a new Drilled miniseries we're calling "Messy Conversations," getting into all the complicated nuance that unfortunately gets cut out of a lot of climate conversations. This week, Magatte Wade, who runs the Center for African Prosperity at the Atlas Network. She wasn't too happy with our recent coverage of Atlas, so we talked about that, the idea that solving poverty and addressing the climate crisis are mutually exclusive, where free speech ends and property rights begin for libertarians, and a whole lot more. Links: Alliance for Responsible Citizenship (ARC): https://www.arcforum.com/ DeSmog profile of ARC: https://www.desmog.com/alliance-for-responsible-citizenship-arc/ DeSmog coverage of ARC 2023 forum: https://www.desmog.com/2023/10/26/gop-climate-denier-vivek-ramaswamy-headlining-jordan-peterson-arc-conference/ Narasimha Rao's Decent Living Energy Project: https://www.decentlivingenergy.org/ Our Guyana season: https://drilled.media/podcasts/drilled#season-8 Center for African Prosperity: https://www.atlasnetwork.org/partners/center-for-african-prosperity Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 1 November 2023

The Tomato Soup "Controversy"

Globally, climate activism has shifted over the past few years. It’s more constant now and includes more direct action than ever before. Some of that action has critics, including climate scientists and climate advocates, clutching their pearls and worrying that protest will turn the public away from the urgent need to act on the climate crisis. But social science researchers who study structural change and protest say there’s no historical evidence to back that up; that in fact the only time social movements have ever affected change is when they’ve been wildly disruptive, and a whole lot of the people who love to quote MLK are missing a significant part of his approach to social change. In this week's ep we hear from social scientists on how radical or not climate protests really are, and what factors make direct action work or fail. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 17 October 2023

Drilled Recommends: Outrage + Optimism — ‘How to talk about climate change so people will listen’ with John Marshall

Welcome to Outrage + Optimism, where they examine issues at the forefront of the climate crisis, interview change-makers, and transform anger into productive dialogue for building a sustainable future. In this episode, the hosts discuss the slow progress made at the negotiations in Bonn and how the perceived lack of direction has led many in the climate community to feel anxious about how successful talks will be in Dubai later in the year. Christiana also touches on the New World Bank report, Detox Development: Repurposing Environmentally Harmful Subsidies, highlighting the trillions of dollars wasted on subsidies for agriculture, fishing and fossil fuels that could be used to help address climate change instead of harming people and the planet. With Tom off to the Global Citizen Power Our Planet Live event on Thursday, the hosts discuss their hopes for a more positive outcome from The Summit for a New Global Financing Pact also happening in Paris this week. Look out for the anticipated momentum to gather pace on Mia Mottley’s Bridgetown Agenda for the much needed reform of international finance. Their special interview this episode is with the brilliant communications expert John Marshall, CEO of Potential Energy Coalition, to discuss climate change’s marketing problem and how we can solve it. Essential listening and the team here all agree we could learn a lot from John’s insights! For anyone wanting to learn more about the important work of Potential Energy, click here. Music this week comes from Hazel Mei and her song Golden Chains, another finalist from this year's Environmental Music Prize. Check out her links below. Thanks to Airaphon who mixed and sound edited the podcast this week. Please don’t forget to let us know what you think here, and / or by contacting us on our social media channels or via the website. NOTES AND RESOURCES SUBSCRIBE TO OUTRAGE + OPTIMISM HERE John Marshall, Chairman and CEO of Potential Energy Coalition LinkedIn | TED Bio Potential Energy Coalition Website | LinkedIn | Instagram Hazel Mei, Environmental Music Prize Finalist Instagram | Facebook | YouTube For anyone wanting to watch the absurd Fox news interview with Power the Future founder, Daniel Turner, here is the link. Learn more about the Paris Agreement. It’s official, we’re a TED Audio Collective Podcast - Proof! Check out more podcasts from The TED Audio Collective Please follow us on social media! Twitter | Instagram | LinkedIn Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 13 October 2023

In Brazil, A Tale as Old as Colonization: Why Indigenous Land Defenders Are Particularly Targeted by Extractive Industries

From Ecuador to North Dakota, British Columbia to New Zealand, the backlash against Indigenous-led environmental protest is always particularly harsh, infused with colonialist entitlement to land, water, and other resources. Historian Nick Estes walks us through what that looks like in the U.S., and the great team behind the documentary The Territory brings us a recent example from Brazil. Check out the film here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 10 October 2023

The Same Australian Think Tanks That Have Pushed Against Climate Policy for Years Say No to Indigenous Rights

Australia's Voice referendum once enjoyed bi-partisan support of more than 60%. But since an aggressive No campaign began in April 2023, that support has plummeted. The folks behind that campaign will be familiar to listeners of this Drilled season: they're primarily Atlas Network think tanks. Jeremy Walker, senior lecturer at the University of Technology Sydney, joins to discuss his new paper on the subject, "Silencing the Voice." You can read that paper here: https://cssn.org/no-campaign-referendum-to-recognise-indigenous-australia-led-by-fossil-fuel-corporations/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 10 October 2023

Guyana Update: Gas to Energy for Guyana, or Problem to Profit for Exxon?

A new report from the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA) looks at the details of Guyana's planned "Gas to Energy" project and finds mostly benefits for ExxonMobil and more debt for Guyana. Read the full report here: https://ieefa.org/articles/guyana-gas-energy-project-unnecessary-and-financially-unsustainable Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 9 October 2023

Joanna Smith on "Conspiring Against the United States" with Fingerpaint

In April 2023, Joanna Oltman Smith walked into the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. with fellow activist Tim Martin, and smeared water-soluble kids' finger paint on the glass display case containing a Degas statue called "Little Dancer." The two read off a statement about the importance of protecting actual, living children as well as we do sculptures of them. Smith and Martin figured they would be charged with vandalism, but each is now facing two felony charges, including one of "conspiring against the United States government." As we covered last month, one thing that makes it easy to criminalize protest is the steady hum of content that paints climate activists as fringe weirdos or out-of-touch elitists. We think it's important to meet these people and bring their stories and voices to you directly. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 3 October 2023

Loss Is on the Calendar in Nigeria

From our pals over at Inherited, in today’s episode, Mo Isu looks at one of the reasons climate activists all over the world are protesting: they're already facing the impacts of climate change. Here, Isu traces the cycle of loss and rebuilding in the rural Niger Delta region of Nigeria as the country weathers extreme seasonal flooding. After meeting a flood survivor in his hometown of Lagos, Mo travels twelve hours to Lokoja – the town where Nigeria’s largest rivers converge – to explore how directly impacted flood survivors endure the region’s relentless cycle of damage and repair. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 26 September 2023

How Think Tanks Laid the Groundwork to Criminalize Protest

It’s no coincidence that the backlash against climate protest looks the same from country to country. Not only is industry sharing tactics across borders, but also the Atlas Network—a global network of nearly 600 libertarian think tanks—has been swapping strategies and rhetoric for decades. This episode features reporting from Amy Westervelt, Lyndal Rowlands, and Julianna Merullo from Drilled, and Geoff Dembicki from DeSmog. You can see a print version of the story at The New Republic or an even longer print version on our site here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 19 September 2023

Meet the Shadowy Global Network Vilifying Climate Protestors

It’s no coincidence that the backlash against climate protest looks the same from country to country. Not only is industry sharing tactics across borders, but also the Atlas Network—a global network of nearly 600 libertarian think tanks—has been swapping strategies and rhetoric for decades. This episode features reporting from Amy Westervelt, Lyndal Rowlands, and Julianna Merullo from Drilled, and Geoff Dembicki from DeSmog. You can see a print version of the story at The New Republic or an even longer print version on our site here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 19 September 2023

In Vietnam, Tax Evasion Charges Help Lock Up Climate Activists

President Biden made his first trip to Vietnam as President this week, with the intention of "upgrading" diplomatic relations between the U.S. and Vietnam. Not on the agenda? The country's move to use trumped-up tax evasion charges to suppress civil society groups, including five climate activists that have been imprisoned using this tactic since 2021. Read The 88 Project's report on this practice: https://the88project.org/weaponizing-the-law-to-prosecute-the-vietnam-four/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 11 September 2023

In Australia, A State-By-State Approach to Criminalizing Climate Protest

Since the 2019 passage of the "Dangerous Attachment Devices" bill in response to anti-coal protests in Queensland, Australia's states have moved quickly to follow suit. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 5 September 2023

The Corporate Push to Criminalize Speech

There's a lot of discourse happening about free speech in the context of "cancel culture" these days, but precious little coverage of the push all over the world to criminalize protest...particularly environmental and climate protest. We'll be digging into this trend in detail over the next several months, but first a look at what prompted extractive industries to start agitating for governments to crack down on protest, what tactics they use, and why they've been so effective. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 29 August 2023

Disha Ravi on Becoming the Face of "Radical" Protest in India at 22

When she was just 22, Disha Ravi, co-founder of Fridays for Future in India, had police show up at her home, borrow a pen and paper to write an arrest warrant on the spot, and bundle her onto a plane to fly across the country to a city she'd never been to. Here she explains what happened, how it's still impacting her two years later, and why she'll never let it stop her activism or force her out of India. An extended version of this interview will run in partnership with the Heated newsletter next week, as the G20 Summit gets underway in Delhi. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 29 August 2023

Disha Ravi on Becoming the Face of "Radical" Protest in India

When she was just 22, Disha Ravi, co-founder of Fridays for Future in India, had police show up at her home, borrow a pen and paper to write an arrest warrant on the spot, and bundle her onto a plane to fly across the country to a city she'd never been to. Here she explains what happened, how it's still impacting her two years later, and why she'll never let it stop her activism or force her out of India. An extended version of this interview will run in partnership with the Heated newsletter next week, as the G20 Summit gets underway in Delhi. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 29 August 2023

How the Media Has Helped to Criminalize Climate Protest, with Evlondo Cooper

Media Matters senior researcher Evlondo Cooper put out a fascinating study earlier this month looking at how the media has covered climate activism. In today's episode we look at the role that flawed coverage has helped the fossil fuel industry in its quest to criminalize climate protest. Check out the study here: https://www.mediamatters.org/broadcast-networks/national-news-scant-coverage-climate-protests-largely-overlooked-scientific Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 22 August 2023

Outside/In: When Protest Is a Crime, Part 1

In the lead-up to our season on the criminalization of protest we're bringing you part 1 of this excellent two-part Outside/In episode looking at this issue in the U.S. When members of the Oceti Sakowin gathered near the Standing Rock Reservation to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline, they decided on a strategy of nonviolent direct action. No violence… against people. But sabotage of property – well, that’s another question entirely. Since the gathering at Standing Rock, anti-protest legislation backed by the fossil fuel industry has swept across the country. What happened? When is environmental protest considered acceptable… and when is it seen as a threat? This is the first of two episodes exploring the changing landscape of environmental protest in the United States, from Standing Rock to Cop City and beyond. Part II is available on Outside/In wherever you get your podcasts Featuring Chase Iron Eyes, Tokata Iron Eyes, Lesley Wood, Elly Page, and Connor Gibson. Special thanks to Phyllis Young and everyone at the Lakota People’s Law Project, especially Daniel Nelson and Jesse Phelps. Thanks also to Soundings Mindful Media. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 15 August 2023

Introducing Our New Season: The Real Free Speech Threat

Around the world, climate and other environmental protestors are being harassed, attacked, and arrested at an alarming rate. Laws are being passed that levy life-altering prison sentences and fines on protestors arrested near anything deemed “critical infrastructure,” which is defined so broadly it’s hard to find a public space that wouldn’t be near it anymore. Corporations are suing protestors and NGOs, comparing protest to organized crime. Governments are growing increasingly comfortable branding environmental protestors as “domestic terrorists.” And so far the media is largely participating in the rhetorical “othering” of protestors, opting in most cases to focus on the disruption that protest causes rather than the change it seeks, and to marginalize activists. In this print and audio series we’ll take an in-depth look at how climate protest has evolved in recent years, where this backlash is coming from, how it’s grown so quickly, and what it feels like to be someone who’s concerned enough about the future of humanity to join a protest, only to find themselves facing police violence and several years in jail. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 15 August 2023

The Climate Impacts of Deep-Sea Mining

Some mining companies claim that we can't "electrify everything" without deep-sea mining—a claim that has been debunked by various scientists. Environmentalists, car companies, and governments are pushing back, citing not only the obvious potential damage to marine ecosystems but also the climate impact of releasing carbon from the ocean floor. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 8 August 2023

Herb, Ep 3: The Next Citizens United Will Be a Climate Case

In more than 30 climate cases making their way through U.S. courts today, oil companies are using an argument they've been laying the legal groundwork for since the 1970s: that since everything they've ever said about climate change was in the interest of shaping policy or blocking regulation, it's protected speech, even if it was misleading. In this episode we take a look at how those cases are playing out and the likelihood that this new take on "corporate free speech" could make it all the way to the Supreme Court. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 1 August 2023

Herb, Ep 2: A Legal Strategy

Worried that all their work creating Mobil's personality and a multi-pronged issue advertising campaign to go with it would go to waste if the TV networks deemed it all "propaganda" Herb and his boss looked to the courts for protection. In this episode we follow the "corporate free speech" movement through the courts, where it got a big assist from tobacco lobbyist-turned-Supreme Court justice Lewis F. Powell. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 25 July 2023

Drilled Presents, Inherited S3: Youth Climate Stories From Around the World

In the Season 3 premiere of Inherited, host Shaylyn Martos introduces us to storyteller Camara Aaron, who shares a personal story of family loss, structural resilience, and survival in an era of climate change. Camara, now 25, was only a child when she visited her grandmother’s unique house on the island of Dominica, in the West Indies. But when Hurricane Maria devastated the Caribbean in 2017, her grandmother died in the storm, leaving Camara to sift through her own hazy memories and reconcile a way forward. Inherited is a critically acclaimed climate storytelling show made by, for, and about young people. We’re a production of YR Media and distributed by Critical Frequency. For more information about our podcast, head to our website at yr.media/inherited, and follow us on the socials @inheritedpod. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 20 July 2023

Herb, Ep 1: The Panic

In the 1970s, Mobil Oil had invented the advertorial and was aggressively pursuing an entirely new type of marketing, branding the company as a person with a unique personality and opinions that deserved to be heard. When public backlash threatened to undermine their approach, they launched a campaign that would change the course of U.S. history. Transcript Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 18 July 2023

Industry Backlash to Grassroots Organizing in Louisiana's "Cancer Alley"

ExxonMobil, Chevron and other petrochemical giants are increasingly organizing against grassroots environmental justice activism in Louisiana that are part of the Beyond Petrochemicals campaign. The companies have joined with pro-industry politicians and local Chambers of Commerce to form a “sustainability council,” focused not on environmental sustainability but on the longevity of the petrochemical industry on Louisiana's Gulf Coast. Jo Banner of The Descendants Project and Shamyra Lavigne of RISE St. James, two key organizers in the area, join us to talk about why the industry is suddenly organizing against them. Read more in The Guardian and Floodlight News exposé here: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/may/04/cancer-alley-louisiana-environment-oil-industry-opposition Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 20 June 2023

The Anti-ESG Campaign Gets a Boost from RAGA

Ever since the Securities and Exchange Commission announced its intention to make Environmental Social and Governance metrics actually mean something to investors, polluting industries have suddenly turned on ESG. Now that fight has a legal strategy, being carried out by the Republican Attorneys General Association. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 13 June 2023

Bingeworthy Interview with Amy Westervelt of Drilled

This week Amy's on the other side of the mic in an interview with Samantha Hodder, who writes the excellent Bingeworthy newsletter, all about narrative podcasts. The newsletter version of this interview, along with Samantha's take on Drilled will be in tomorrow's Bingeworthy, so make sure to subscribe here: https://bingeworthy.substack.com/ Ad links in this ep: First Leaf: tryfirstleaf.com/drilled for 50% off your first shipment of six bottles AG1 : athleticgreens.com/drilled for a year's supply of vitamin D plus 5 free travel packs of AG1 with your first order. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 6 June 2023

Drilled Presents: Living Planet on Disinformation

Living Planet is a podcast and radio program from Germany’s international broadcaster, Deutsche Welle (DW). Hosted by Charli Shield and Sam Baker, each week Living Planet reports on environment stories from around the world. In this episode of Living Planet, host Sam Baker speaks with three experts on climate disinformation about how factually inaccurate and misleading information travels around the web. Climate journalist Stella Levantesi, communication researcher John Cook and Wikimedia strategist Alex Stinson participated in this engaging round-table, which originally was broadcast as a live discussion. More Living Planet episodes are available at: pod.link/livingplanet Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Transcribed - Published: 2 June 2023

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