Tapesearch Logo

Serial S01 - Ep. 10: The Best Defense is a Good Defense

Serial

Serial Productions & The New York Times

True Crime, Society & Culture, News

4.680.4K Ratings

🗓️ 4 December 2014

⏱️ 53 minutes

🧾️ Download transcript

Summary

Adnan’s trial lawyer was M. Cristina Gutierrez, a renowned defense attorney in Maryland – tough and savvy and smart. Other lawyers said she was exactly the kind of person you’d want defending you on a first-degree murder charge. But Adnan was convicted, and a year later, Gutierrez was disbarred. What happened?

Audio player

Transcript

Click on a timestamp to play from that location.

Note: Timestamps may have shifted due to changing advertisements

0:00.0

previously on cereal there's no way that she was at best by 236

0:07.4

did anybody else use the phone? yeah um and on I remember he was talking to a girl um he put

0:14.4

me on a phone with her for like three minutes that said hello to her to be a 17-year-old kid

0:19.6

with no experience with the system, no experience with any of this stuff it's very difficult

0:24.1

to believe in the early stages that this is actually what's happening this must be just some

0:28.1

From this American life in W.B.E.Z. Chicago, it's serial, one story told week by week.

0:53.6

I'm Sarah Canig.

0:57.1

Today's episode is mostly going to take place in the courtroom.

0:59.8

And before we get into the arguments at trial, I just want to play you this thing from a

1:03.5

nun's jury selection.

1:04.8

I used to be a reporter for the Baltimore Sun and I covered some trials.

1:09.4

And if I happen to be in the courtroom for jury selection, it was always such a good

1:12.9

reminder of what living in Baltimore was like for so many people.

1:17.7

Here's what I'm talking about.

1:19.0

December 8, 1999, jury selection for a nun's first trial.

1:23.3

Judge William Quarrell asks a standard question of the jury pool.

1:26.6

Have you or any close family member ever been the victim of a crime, convicted of a crime,

1:36.2

served time for a crime, or have pending criminal charges?

1:41.8

A lot of people rise from their seats and then line up to talk to the judge.

1:46.0

I can't tell exactly what proportion of the jury pool but it looks to be at least half.

1:50.1

Why don't you come up to tell me?

1:52.1

My husband's son was convicted of murder.

...

Please login to see the full transcript.

Disclaimer: The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Serial Productions & The New York Times, and are the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Tapesearch.

Generated transcripts are the property of Serial Productions & The New York Times and are distributed freely under the Fair Use doctrine. Transcripts generated by Tapesearch are not guaranteed to be accurate.

Copyright © Tapesearch 2024.